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Recruitment, retention and matriculation of ethnic minority nursing students: a University of Mississippi School of Nursing approach.
J Cult Divers. 2003 Winter; 10(4):128-33.JC

Abstract

According to Bednash (2000), the future of health care pivots on an adequate supply of appropriately educated and skilled professional registered nurses. Recognizing the long history of and the struggles by African-American (AA) nurses for education and equality in the nursing profession, it is essential that more African-American students be recruited, retained, and matriculated into the profession of nursing. African-American nurses have always contributed to the care of the poor and the sick and played a decisive role in the improvement of the health of their communities. The Bureau of Health Professions Division of nursing (March 2000) reported that 86.6 percent of the registered nurse population were white while 12.3 percent represented racial and ethnic minority groups. Given the current racial/ethnic background of the registered nurse population in the United States, there is an obvious disparity in the representation of minorities in the nursing profession, in spite of the increasing number of minorities represented in the general population. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to document strategies that are used to actively recruit, retain, and graduate ethnic minority students from the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) School of Nursing (SON).

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15000056

Citation

Fletcher, Audwin, et al. "Recruitment, Retention and Matriculation of Ethnic Minority Nursing Students: a University of Mississippi School of Nursing Approach." Journal of Cultural Diversity, vol. 10, no. 4, 2003, pp. 128-33.
Fletcher A, Williams PR, Beacham T, et al. Recruitment, retention and matriculation of ethnic minority nursing students: a University of Mississippi School of Nursing approach. J Cult Divers. 2003;10(4):128-33.
Fletcher, A., Williams, P. R., Beacham, T., Elliott, R. W., Northington, L., Calvin, R., Hill, M., Haynes, A., Winters, K., & Davis, S. (2003). Recruitment, retention and matriculation of ethnic minority nursing students: a University of Mississippi School of Nursing approach. Journal of Cultural Diversity, 10(4), 128-33.
Fletcher A, et al. Recruitment, Retention and Matriculation of Ethnic Minority Nursing Students: a University of Mississippi School of Nursing Approach. J Cult Divers. 2003;10(4):128-33. PubMed PMID: 15000056.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Recruitment, retention and matriculation of ethnic minority nursing students: a University of Mississippi School of Nursing approach. AU - Fletcher,Audwin, AU - Williams,P Renee, AU - Beacham,Tracilia, AU - Elliott,Rowena W, AU - Northington,LaDonna, AU - Calvin,Rosie, AU - Hill,Mary, AU - Haynes,Avis, AU - Winters,Karen, AU - Davis,Sheila, PY - 2004/3/6/pubmed PY - 2004/4/10/medline PY - 2004/3/6/entrez SP - 128 EP - 33 JF - Journal of cultural diversity JO - J Cult Divers VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - According to Bednash (2000), the future of health care pivots on an adequate supply of appropriately educated and skilled professional registered nurses. Recognizing the long history of and the struggles by African-American (AA) nurses for education and equality in the nursing profession, it is essential that more African-American students be recruited, retained, and matriculated into the profession of nursing. African-American nurses have always contributed to the care of the poor and the sick and played a decisive role in the improvement of the health of their communities. The Bureau of Health Professions Division of nursing (March 2000) reported that 86.6 percent of the registered nurse population were white while 12.3 percent represented racial and ethnic minority groups. Given the current racial/ethnic background of the registered nurse population in the United States, there is an obvious disparity in the representation of minorities in the nursing profession, in spite of the increasing number of minorities represented in the general population. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to document strategies that are used to actively recruit, retain, and graduate ethnic minority students from the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) School of Nursing (SON). SN - 1071-5568 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15000056/Recruitment_retention_and_matriculation_of_ethnic_minority_nursing_students:_a_University_of_Mississippi_School_of_Nursing_approach_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -