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Using cooperative learning in clinical laboratory science education.
Clin Lab Sci 2004; 17(1):12-8CL

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare performance of students instructed by cooperative learning (CL) activities with those taught by lecture. A secondary objective was to assess students' perceptions about their ability to work in teams before and after their exposure to these instructional approaches.

DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS

CL was incorporated into the immunology/serology course of a university-based clinical laboratory science (CLS) program. Twenty-two students participated in a 4-week study and were randomly assigned to one of two study groups.

INTERVENTION

One group received the course material by CL activities, and the other group was exposed to the material through lecture.

MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURE

Mean examination scores for CL and lecture groups were compared using an independent samples t-test. Teamwork knowledge, skills, and attitude (KSA) assessment rated students' perceptions of their ability to work in a team environment pre and post tests were compared using a 2 x 2 repeated measures ANOVA.

RESULTS

No significant difference was found between mean examination scores of students who acquired their knowledge by CL activities (85.09%) and those taught by lecture (82.18%). Teamwork KSA means scores pre and post tests (22.5, 22.6 CL; 22.7, 21.6 lecture) were not significantly different.

CONCLUSION

Results suggest that the incorporation of CL activities did not reduce the students' academic performance or self-perceptions of their ability to work in teams. The use of CL in the classroom, student laboratory, or clinical setting may help prepare students for the role they will be expected to perform as laboratory professionals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

South Arkansas Community College, El Dorado, AR, USA. mjbose@cox-internet.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15011975

Citation

Bose, Mary J., et al. "Using Cooperative Learning in Clinical Laboratory Science Education." Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, vol. 17, no. 1, 2004, pp. 12-8.
Bose MJ, Jarreau PC, Lawrence LW, et al. Using cooperative learning in clinical laboratory science education. Clin Lab Sci. 2004;17(1):12-8.
Bose, M. J., Jarreau, P. C., Lawrence, L. W., & Snyder, P. (2004). Using cooperative learning in clinical laboratory science education. Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, 17(1), pp. 12-8.
Bose MJ, et al. Using Cooperative Learning in Clinical Laboratory Science Education. Clin Lab Sci. 2004;17(1):12-8. PubMed PMID: 15011975.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Using cooperative learning in clinical laboratory science education. AU - Bose,Mary J, AU - Jarreau,Patsy C, AU - Lawrence,Louann W, AU - Snyder,Patricia, PY - 2004/3/12/pubmed PY - 2004/3/24/medline PY - 2004/3/12/entrez SP - 12 EP - 8 JF - Clinical laboratory science : journal of the American Society for Medical Technology JO - Clin Lab Sci VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare performance of students instructed by cooperative learning (CL) activities with those taught by lecture. A secondary objective was to assess students' perceptions about their ability to work in teams before and after their exposure to these instructional approaches. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: CL was incorporated into the immunology/serology course of a university-based clinical laboratory science (CLS) program. Twenty-two students participated in a 4-week study and were randomly assigned to one of two study groups. INTERVENTION: One group received the course material by CL activities, and the other group was exposed to the material through lecture. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURE: Mean examination scores for CL and lecture groups were compared using an independent samples t-test. Teamwork knowledge, skills, and attitude (KSA) assessment rated students' perceptions of their ability to work in a team environment pre and post tests were compared using a 2 x 2 repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between mean examination scores of students who acquired their knowledge by CL activities (85.09%) and those taught by lecture (82.18%). Teamwork KSA means scores pre and post tests (22.5, 22.6 CL; 22.7, 21.6 lecture) were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that the incorporation of CL activities did not reduce the students' academic performance or self-perceptions of their ability to work in teams. The use of CL in the classroom, student laboratory, or clinical setting may help prepare students for the role they will be expected to perform as laboratory professionals. SN - 0894-959X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15011975/Using_cooperative_learning_in_clinical_laboratory_science_education_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -