Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Acute effect of drinking red and white wines on circulating levels of inflammation-sensitive molecules in men with coronary artery disease.
Metabolism. 2004 Mar; 53(3):318-23.M

Abstract

There is evidence that moderate consumption of red wine with its high content of polyphenolic antioxidants may be more protective than white wine against development of coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of ingestion of red wine and white wine on markers of inflammation in men with CAD. Thirteen men with angiographically-proven CAD were studied in a cross-over trial. The men consumed 4 mL/kg (2 to 3 glasses) red wine and white wine in random order during a light meal and with at least a week between interventions. Later, the men also consumed an isoenergetic nonalcoholic beverage (control) in the same study protocol. Venous blood was taken at baseline, 1 hour, and 6 hours after the drinks. Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), blood alcohol, plasma lipids, and plasma polyphenols were measured. Mean +/- SD blood alcohol was 6.5 +/- 2.2 mmol/L and 6.9 +/- 1.1 mmol/L at 1 hour and returned to baseline at 6 hours after intake of red wine and white wine, respectively. Plasma IL-6 concentration increased significantly (P =.01) during 6 hours after ingestion of red wine (56%) and white wine (63%). The increase in plasma IL-6 concentration after ingestion of wine was significantly higher (P =.045) compared with the corresponding increase (11%) following intake of the nonalcoholic beverage. Plasma IL-6 levels at 6 hours (r =.631, P =.02) were correlated significantly with plasma alcohol levels at 1 hour after ingestion of red wine. These data suggest that moderate wine intake may acutely increase plasma levels of IL-6 in men with CAD. It is possible that this increase in plasma IL-6 is a response to alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the liver.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Ontago, Dunedin, New Zealand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15015143

Citation

Williams, Michael J A., et al. "Acute Effect of Drinking Red and White Wines On Circulating Levels of Inflammation-sensitive Molecules in Men With Coronary Artery Disease." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 53, no. 3, 2004, pp. 318-23.
Williams MJ, Sutherland WH, Whelan AP, et al. Acute effect of drinking red and white wines on circulating levels of inflammation-sensitive molecules in men with coronary artery disease. Metabolism. 2004;53(3):318-23.
Williams, M. J., Sutherland, W. H., Whelan, A. P., McCormick, M. P., & de Jong, S. A. (2004). Acute effect of drinking red and white wines on circulating levels of inflammation-sensitive molecules in men with coronary artery disease. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 53(3), 318-23.
Williams MJ, et al. Acute Effect of Drinking Red and White Wines On Circulating Levels of Inflammation-sensitive Molecules in Men With Coronary Artery Disease. Metabolism. 2004;53(3):318-23. PubMed PMID: 15015143.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute effect of drinking red and white wines on circulating levels of inflammation-sensitive molecules in men with coronary artery disease. AU - Williams,Michael J A, AU - Sutherland,Wayne H F, AU - Whelan,Alan P, AU - McCormick,Maree P, AU - de Jong,Sylvia A, PY - 2004/3/12/pubmed PY - 2004/4/10/medline PY - 2004/3/12/entrez SP - 318 EP - 23 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metabolism VL - 53 IS - 3 N2 - There is evidence that moderate consumption of red wine with its high content of polyphenolic antioxidants may be more protective than white wine against development of coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of ingestion of red wine and white wine on markers of inflammation in men with CAD. Thirteen men with angiographically-proven CAD were studied in a cross-over trial. The men consumed 4 mL/kg (2 to 3 glasses) red wine and white wine in random order during a light meal and with at least a week between interventions. Later, the men also consumed an isoenergetic nonalcoholic beverage (control) in the same study protocol. Venous blood was taken at baseline, 1 hour, and 6 hours after the drinks. Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), blood alcohol, plasma lipids, and plasma polyphenols were measured. Mean +/- SD blood alcohol was 6.5 +/- 2.2 mmol/L and 6.9 +/- 1.1 mmol/L at 1 hour and returned to baseline at 6 hours after intake of red wine and white wine, respectively. Plasma IL-6 concentration increased significantly (P =.01) during 6 hours after ingestion of red wine (56%) and white wine (63%). The increase in plasma IL-6 concentration after ingestion of wine was significantly higher (P =.045) compared with the corresponding increase (11%) following intake of the nonalcoholic beverage. Plasma IL-6 levels at 6 hours (r =.631, P =.02) were correlated significantly with plasma alcohol levels at 1 hour after ingestion of red wine. These data suggest that moderate wine intake may acutely increase plasma levels of IL-6 in men with CAD. It is possible that this increase in plasma IL-6 is a response to alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the liver. SN - 0026-0495 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15015143/Acute_effect_of_drinking_red_and_white_wines_on_circulating_levels_of_inflammation_sensitive_molecules_in_men_with_coronary_artery_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026049503005067 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -