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Gender-typical responses to sexual and emotional infidelity as a function of mortality salience induced self-esteem striving.
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2003 Dec; 29(12):1585-95.PS

Abstract

The authors propose that gender-differentiated patterns of jealousy in response to sexual and emotional infidelity are engendered by the differential impact of each event on self-esteem for men and women. Study 1 demonstrated that men derive relatively more self-esteem from their sex lives, whereas women's self-esteem is more contingent on romantic commitment. Based on terror management theory, it is predicted that if gender-differentiated responses to infidelity are motivated by gender-specific contingencies for self-esteem, they should be intensified following reminders of mortality. In Study 2, mortality salience (MS) increased distress in response to sexual infidelity for men and emotional infidelity for women. Study 3 demonstrated that following MS, men who place high value on sex in romantic relationships exhibited greater distress in response to sexual infidelity, but low-ex-value men's distress was attenuated. The authors discuss the implications for evolutionary and self-esteem-based accounts of jealousy as well as possible integration of these perspectives.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis 95616-8686, USA. jgolden@ucdavis.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15018688

Citation

Goldenberg, Jamie L., et al. "Gender-typical Responses to Sexual and Emotional Infidelity as a Function of Mortality Salience Induced Self-esteem Striving." Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, vol. 29, no. 12, 2003, pp. 1585-95.
Goldenberg JL, Landau MJ, Pyszczynski T, et al. Gender-typical responses to sexual and emotional infidelity as a function of mortality salience induced self-esteem striving. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2003;29(12):1585-95.
Goldenberg, J. L., Landau, M. J., Pyszczynski, T., Cox, C. R., Greenberg, J., Solomon, S., & Dunnam, H. (2003). Gender-typical responses to sexual and emotional infidelity as a function of mortality salience induced self-esteem striving. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 29(12), 1585-95.
Goldenberg JL, et al. Gender-typical Responses to Sexual and Emotional Infidelity as a Function of Mortality Salience Induced Self-esteem Striving. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2003;29(12):1585-95. PubMed PMID: 15018688.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender-typical responses to sexual and emotional infidelity as a function of mortality salience induced self-esteem striving. AU - Goldenberg,Jamie L, AU - Landau,Mark J, AU - Pyszczynski,Tom, AU - Cox,Cathy R, AU - Greenberg,Jeff, AU - Solomon,Sheldon, AU - Dunnam,Heather, PY - 2004/3/17/pubmed PY - 2004/5/5/medline PY - 2004/3/17/entrez SP - 1585 EP - 95 JF - Personality & social psychology bulletin JO - Pers Soc Psychol Bull VL - 29 IS - 12 N2 - The authors propose that gender-differentiated patterns of jealousy in response to sexual and emotional infidelity are engendered by the differential impact of each event on self-esteem for men and women. Study 1 demonstrated that men derive relatively more self-esteem from their sex lives, whereas women's self-esteem is more contingent on romantic commitment. Based on terror management theory, it is predicted that if gender-differentiated responses to infidelity are motivated by gender-specific contingencies for self-esteem, they should be intensified following reminders of mortality. In Study 2, mortality salience (MS) increased distress in response to sexual infidelity for men and emotional infidelity for women. Study 3 demonstrated that following MS, men who place high value on sex in romantic relationships exhibited greater distress in response to sexual infidelity, but low-ex-value men's distress was attenuated. The authors discuss the implications for evolutionary and self-esteem-based accounts of jealousy as well as possible integration of these perspectives. SN - 0146-1672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15018688/Gender_typical_responses_to_sexual_and_emotional_infidelity_as_a_function_of_mortality_salience_induced_self_esteem_striving_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0146167203256880?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -