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Well-being and life satisfaction in generalized anxiety disorder: comparison to major depressive disorder in a community sample.
J Affect Disord. 2004 Apr; 79(1-3):161-6.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In most settings, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is highly comorbid with major depressive disorder (MDD). This raises uncertainty about the clinical relevance of GAD as a distinct diagnostic entity. The demonstration of functional impairment attached to GAD, independent of that attributable to MDD, would support the importance of GAD as a separate diagnostic category.

METHODS

The Ontario Health Survey Mental Health Supplement, a survey of more than 8000 residents aged 15-64 of the Canadian province of Ontario, used the University of Michigan Composite International Interview Schedule (also used in the US National Comorbidity Survey) to assign DSM-III-R diagnoses. Several indicators of disability and quality of life were included. Our analytic strategy was to compare these indices in persons with and without GAD, stratified by MDD comorbidity, and adjusting for the effects of relevant sociodemographic factors (e.g., social class, age, gender) and dysthymia. Odds ratios (ORs) are reported; SUDAAN was used to adjust for the sampling framework.

RESULTS

GAD was highly comorbid with MDD on both a lifetime and past-year basis. Both past-year and lifetime MDD and GAD were associated with an increased likelihood of low overall perceived well-being. Both lifetime MDD and GAD were associated with dissatisfaction in one's main activity and with family relationships.

LIMITATIONS

Other comorbid Axis I or II conditions might be confounders with impairment; a lower rate of GAD than in some prior surveys bears consideration.

CONCLUSIONS

These observations confirm that GAD is associated with an increased likelihood of poor global well-being and life satisfaction, beyond that associated with MDD. Given the chronicity of GAD relative to the more often episodic course of MDD, the long-term functional benefits of treating GAD may be substantial.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders Program Department of Psychiatry (0985), University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0985, USA. mstein@ucsd.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15023490

Citation

Stein, Murray B., and Richard G. Heimberg. "Well-being and Life Satisfaction in Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Comparison to Major Depressive Disorder in a Community Sample." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 79, no. 1-3, 2004, pp. 161-6.
Stein MB, Heimberg RG. Well-being and life satisfaction in generalized anxiety disorder: comparison to major depressive disorder in a community sample. J Affect Disord. 2004;79(1-3):161-6.
Stein, M. B., & Heimberg, R. G. (2004). Well-being and life satisfaction in generalized anxiety disorder: comparison to major depressive disorder in a community sample. Journal of Affective Disorders, 79(1-3), 161-6.
Stein MB, Heimberg RG. Well-being and Life Satisfaction in Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Comparison to Major Depressive Disorder in a Community Sample. J Affect Disord. 2004;79(1-3):161-6. PubMed PMID: 15023490.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Well-being and life satisfaction in generalized anxiety disorder: comparison to major depressive disorder in a community sample. AU - Stein,Murray B, AU - Heimberg,Richard G, PY - 2002/03/25/received PY - 2002/10/15/accepted PY - 2004/3/17/pubmed PY - 2004/6/23/medline PY - 2004/3/17/entrez SP - 161 EP - 6 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 79 IS - 1-3 N2 - BACKGROUND: In most settings, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is highly comorbid with major depressive disorder (MDD). This raises uncertainty about the clinical relevance of GAD as a distinct diagnostic entity. The demonstration of functional impairment attached to GAD, independent of that attributable to MDD, would support the importance of GAD as a separate diagnostic category. METHODS: The Ontario Health Survey Mental Health Supplement, a survey of more than 8000 residents aged 15-64 of the Canadian province of Ontario, used the University of Michigan Composite International Interview Schedule (also used in the US National Comorbidity Survey) to assign DSM-III-R diagnoses. Several indicators of disability and quality of life were included. Our analytic strategy was to compare these indices in persons with and without GAD, stratified by MDD comorbidity, and adjusting for the effects of relevant sociodemographic factors (e.g., social class, age, gender) and dysthymia. Odds ratios (ORs) are reported; SUDAAN was used to adjust for the sampling framework. RESULTS: GAD was highly comorbid with MDD on both a lifetime and past-year basis. Both past-year and lifetime MDD and GAD were associated with an increased likelihood of low overall perceived well-being. Both lifetime MDD and GAD were associated with dissatisfaction in one's main activity and with family relationships. LIMITATIONS: Other comorbid Axis I or II conditions might be confounders with impairment; a lower rate of GAD than in some prior surveys bears consideration. CONCLUSIONS: These observations confirm that GAD is associated with an increased likelihood of poor global well-being and life satisfaction, beyond that associated with MDD. Given the chronicity of GAD relative to the more often episodic course of MDD, the long-term functional benefits of treating GAD may be substantial. SN - 0165-0327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15023490/Well_being_and_life_satisfaction_in_generalized_anxiety_disorder:_comparison_to_major_depressive_disorder_in_a_community_sample_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165032702004573 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -