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Effects of conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate on lipoprotein(a) and other lipoproteins in japanese postmenopausal women with and without dyslipidemia.
Horm Res. 2004; 62(1):1-9.HR

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIM

The cardiovascular effects of postmenopausal hormone replacement are controversially discussed. We investigated the effects of 12 months of treatment with conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate on lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and other lipoproteins in Japanese postmenopausal women (PMW) with and without dyslipidemia.

METHODS

Forty-three normolipidemic and 17 dyslipidemic PMW [total cholesterol (TC) >/=220 mg/dl or triglyceride (TG) >/=150 mg/dl] received conjugated equine estrogen (0.625 mg) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (2.5 mg) daily for 12 months, and the results were compared with those of 26 normolipidemic and 14 dyslipidemic subjects declining this treatment as controls. The fasting serum levels of Lp(a), TC, TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low- density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein (Apo) AI, Apo AII, Apo B, Apo CII, and Apo E were measured in each subject at baseline and 12 months after this treatment initiation.

RESULTS

The treatment decreased Lp(a) similarly in normolipidemic and dyslipidemic PMW and decreased TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, Apo CII, and Apo E and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, Apo AI, and Apo AII in both groups. The therapy also significantly increased TG in normolipidemic but not dyslipidemic subjects. In controls, the levels of Lp(a) and other lipoproteins were unaltered.

CONCLUSIONS

In PMW with or without dyslipidemia, improvement in Lp(a) and other lipoproteins may represent cardiovascular benefits of hormone replacement therapy. However, an elevation of the TG levels seen with the therapy warrants caution, especially in PMW without dyslipidemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Gunma University School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan. suminoh@med.gunma-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15031614

Citation

Sumino, Hiroyuki, et al. "Effects of Conjugated Equine Estrogen and Medroxyprogesterone Acetate On Lipoprotein(a) and Other Lipoproteins in Japanese Postmenopausal Women With and Without Dyslipidemia." Hormone Research, vol. 62, no. 1, 2004, pp. 1-9.
Sumino H, Ichikawa S, Sakamoto H, et al. Effects of conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate on lipoprotein(a) and other lipoproteins in japanese postmenopausal women with and without dyslipidemia. Horm Res. 2004;62(1):1-9.
Sumino, H., Ichikawa, S., Sakamoto, H., Sawada, Y., Kumakura, H., Takayama, Y., Sakamaki, T., & Kurabayashi, M. (2004). Effects of conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate on lipoprotein(a) and other lipoproteins in japanese postmenopausal women with and without dyslipidemia. Hormone Research, 62(1), 1-9.
Sumino H, et al. Effects of Conjugated Equine Estrogen and Medroxyprogesterone Acetate On Lipoprotein(a) and Other Lipoproteins in Japanese Postmenopausal Women With and Without Dyslipidemia. Horm Res. 2004;62(1):1-9. PubMed PMID: 15031614.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate on lipoprotein(a) and other lipoproteins in japanese postmenopausal women with and without dyslipidemia. AU - Sumino,Hiroyuki, AU - Ichikawa,Shuichi, AU - Sakamoto,Hironosuke, AU - Sawada,Yoshie, AU - Kumakura,Hisao, AU - Takayama,Yoshiaki, AU - Sakamaki,Tetsuo, AU - Kurabayashi,Masahiko, Y1 - 2004/03/18/ PY - 2003/08/11/received PY - 2004/02/10/accepted PY - 2004/3/20/pubmed PY - 2004/12/22/medline PY - 2004/3/20/entrez SP - 1 EP - 9 JF - Hormone research JO - Horm Res VL - 62 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIM: The cardiovascular effects of postmenopausal hormone replacement are controversially discussed. We investigated the effects of 12 months of treatment with conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate on lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and other lipoproteins in Japanese postmenopausal women (PMW) with and without dyslipidemia. METHODS: Forty-three normolipidemic and 17 dyslipidemic PMW [total cholesterol (TC) >/=220 mg/dl or triglyceride (TG) >/=150 mg/dl] received conjugated equine estrogen (0.625 mg) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (2.5 mg) daily for 12 months, and the results were compared with those of 26 normolipidemic and 14 dyslipidemic subjects declining this treatment as controls. The fasting serum levels of Lp(a), TC, TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low- density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein (Apo) AI, Apo AII, Apo B, Apo CII, and Apo E were measured in each subject at baseline and 12 months after this treatment initiation. RESULTS: The treatment decreased Lp(a) similarly in normolipidemic and dyslipidemic PMW and decreased TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, Apo CII, and Apo E and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, Apo AI, and Apo AII in both groups. The therapy also significantly increased TG in normolipidemic but not dyslipidemic subjects. In controls, the levels of Lp(a) and other lipoproteins were unaltered. CONCLUSIONS: In PMW with or without dyslipidemia, improvement in Lp(a) and other lipoproteins may represent cardiovascular benefits of hormone replacement therapy. However, an elevation of the TG levels seen with the therapy warrants caution, especially in PMW without dyslipidemia. SN - 0301-0163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15031614/Effects_of_conjugated_equine_estrogen_and_medroxyprogesterone_acetate_on_lipoprotein_a__and_other_lipoproteins_in_japanese_postmenopausal_women_with_and_without_dyslipidemia_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000077399 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -