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Effects of 3-D complexity on the perception of 2-D depictions of objects.
Perception. 2004; 33(1):21-33.P

Abstract

In a recent study, Pelli (1999 Science 285 844-846) performed a set of perceptual experiments using portrait paintings by Chuck Close. Close's work is similar to the 'Lincoln' portraits of Harmon and Julesz (1973 Science 180 1194-1197) in that they are composite images consisting of coarsely sampled, individually painted, mostly homogeneous cells. Pelli showed that perceived shape was dependent on size, refuting findings that perception of this type is scale-invariant. In an attempt to broaden this finding we designed a series of experiments to investigate the interaction of 2-D scale and 3-D structure on our perception of 3-D shape. We present a series of experiments where field of view, 3-D object complexity, 2-D image resolution, viewing orientation, and subject matter of the stimulus are manipulated. On each trial, observers indicated if the depicted objects appeared to be 2-D or 3-D. Results for face stimuli are similar to Pelli's, while more geometrically complex stimuli show a further interaction of the 3-D information with distance and image information. Complex objects need more image information to be seen as 3-D when close; however, as they are moved further away from the observer, there is a bias for seeing them as 3-D objects rather than 2-D images. Finally, image orientation, relative to the observer, shows little effect, suggesting the participation of higher-level processes in the determination of the 'solidness' of the depicted object. Thus, we show that the critical image resolution depends systematically on the geometric complexity of the object depicted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-1632, USA. flip@skidmore.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15035326

Citation

Phillips, Flip, et al. "Effects of 3-D Complexity On the Perception of 2-D Depictions of Objects." Perception, vol. 33, no. 1, 2004, pp. 21-33.
Phillips F, Thompson CH, Voshell MG. Effects of 3-D complexity on the perception of 2-D depictions of objects. Perception. 2004;33(1):21-33.
Phillips, F., Thompson, C. H., & Voshell, M. G. (2004). Effects of 3-D complexity on the perception of 2-D depictions of objects. Perception, 33(1), 21-33.
Phillips F, Thompson CH, Voshell MG. Effects of 3-D Complexity On the Perception of 2-D Depictions of Objects. Perception. 2004;33(1):21-33. PubMed PMID: 15035326.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of 3-D complexity on the perception of 2-D depictions of objects. AU - Phillips,Flip, AU - Thompson,Colin H, AU - Voshell,Martin G, PY - 2004/3/24/pubmed PY - 2004/5/18/medline PY - 2004/3/24/entrez SP - 21 EP - 33 JF - Perception JO - Perception VL - 33 IS - 1 N2 - In a recent study, Pelli (1999 Science 285 844-846) performed a set of perceptual experiments using portrait paintings by Chuck Close. Close's work is similar to the 'Lincoln' portraits of Harmon and Julesz (1973 Science 180 1194-1197) in that they are composite images consisting of coarsely sampled, individually painted, mostly homogeneous cells. Pelli showed that perceived shape was dependent on size, refuting findings that perception of this type is scale-invariant. In an attempt to broaden this finding we designed a series of experiments to investigate the interaction of 2-D scale and 3-D structure on our perception of 3-D shape. We present a series of experiments where field of view, 3-D object complexity, 2-D image resolution, viewing orientation, and subject matter of the stimulus are manipulated. On each trial, observers indicated if the depicted objects appeared to be 2-D or 3-D. Results for face stimuli are similar to Pelli's, while more geometrically complex stimuli show a further interaction of the 3-D information with distance and image information. Complex objects need more image information to be seen as 3-D when close; however, as they are moved further away from the observer, there is a bias for seeing them as 3-D objects rather than 2-D images. Finally, image orientation, relative to the observer, shows little effect, suggesting the participation of higher-level processes in the determination of the 'solidness' of the depicted object. Thus, we show that the critical image resolution depends systematically on the geometric complexity of the object depicted. SN - 0301-0066 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15035326/Effects_of_3_D_complexity_on_the_perception_of_2_D_depictions_of_objects_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1068/p5099?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -