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Effect of porcine parvovirus vaccination on the development of PMWS in segregated early weaned pigs coinfected with type 2 porcine circovirus and porcine parvovirus.
Vet Microbiol. 2004 Mar 05; 98(3-4):209-20.VM

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine if coinfection of segregated early weaned (SEW) pigs with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine parvovirus (PPV) induces an increase in the incidence of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) compared to singular PCV2 infection, and to determine if vaccination against PPV protects pigs against PMWS associated with PCV2/PPV coinfection in SEW pigs. Seventy, 3-week-old, SEW pigs were randomly assigned to one of the five groups. Pigs in group 1 (n = 14) served as the negative controls, group 2 pigs (n = 14) were inoculated with PCV2, group 3 pigs (n = 12) were inoculated with PPV, groups 4 (n = 16) and 5 (n = 14) pigs were inoculated with both PCV2 and PPV. Pigs in groups 1-3 and 5 were vaccinated with two doses of a killed parvovirus-leptospira-erysipelothrix (PLE) vaccine prior to inoculation. The PCV2/PPV-coinfected pigs (groups 4 and 5) had significantly (P < 0.05) higher and more persistent fevers than the singular PCV2-infected pigs. One pig in each of the coinfected groups developed clinical disease (fever, respiratory disease, jaundice, weight loss) consistent with PMWS. Lymphoid depletion was significantly (P < 0.05) more severe in the dually-infected pigs at 42 days post-inoculation (DPI). Vaccinated, coinfected pigs (group 5) remained viremic significantly (P < 0.05) longer and had higher copy numbers of genomic PCV2 DNA in sera at 28, 35, and 42 DPI compared to the unvaccinated coinfected pigs (group 4). PPV-viremia was detected only in the unvaccinated group 4 pigs. PLE-vaccination prevented PPV-viremia but did not prevent clinical PMWS or reduce the severity of lymphoid depletion in PCV2/PPV-coinfected pigs. Evidence of increased incidence of clinical PMWS due to vaccination was not observed in this model.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1250, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15036529

Citation

Opriessnig, T, et al. "Effect of Porcine Parvovirus Vaccination On the Development of PMWS in Segregated Early Weaned Pigs Coinfected With Type 2 Porcine Circovirus and Porcine Parvovirus." Veterinary Microbiology, vol. 98, no. 3-4, 2004, pp. 209-20.
Opriessnig T, Fenaux M, Yu S, et al. Effect of porcine parvovirus vaccination on the development of PMWS in segregated early weaned pigs coinfected with type 2 porcine circovirus and porcine parvovirus. Vet Microbiol. 2004;98(3-4):209-20.
Opriessnig, T., Fenaux, M., Yu, S., Evans, R. B., Cavanaugh, D., Gallup, J. M., Pallares, F. J., Thacker, E. L., Lager, K. M., Meng, X. J., & Halbur, P. G. (2004). Effect of porcine parvovirus vaccination on the development of PMWS in segregated early weaned pigs coinfected with type 2 porcine circovirus and porcine parvovirus. Veterinary Microbiology, 98(3-4), 209-20.
Opriessnig T, et al. Effect of Porcine Parvovirus Vaccination On the Development of PMWS in Segregated Early Weaned Pigs Coinfected With Type 2 Porcine Circovirus and Porcine Parvovirus. Vet Microbiol. 2004 Mar 5;98(3-4):209-20. PubMed PMID: 15036529.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of porcine parvovirus vaccination on the development of PMWS in segregated early weaned pigs coinfected with type 2 porcine circovirus and porcine parvovirus. AU - Opriessnig,T, AU - Fenaux,M, AU - Yu,S, AU - Evans,R B, AU - Cavanaugh,D, AU - Gallup,J M, AU - Pallares,F J, AU - Thacker,E L, AU - Lager,K M, AU - Meng,X J, AU - Halbur,P G, PY - 2003/05/20/received PY - 2003/11/06/revised PY - 2003/11/06/accepted PY - 2004/3/24/pubmed PY - 2004/5/21/medline PY - 2004/3/24/entrez SP - 209 EP - 20 JF - Veterinary microbiology JO - Vet. Microbiol. VL - 98 IS - 3-4 N2 - The objectives of this study were to determine if coinfection of segregated early weaned (SEW) pigs with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine parvovirus (PPV) induces an increase in the incidence of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) compared to singular PCV2 infection, and to determine if vaccination against PPV protects pigs against PMWS associated with PCV2/PPV coinfection in SEW pigs. Seventy, 3-week-old, SEW pigs were randomly assigned to one of the five groups. Pigs in group 1 (n = 14) served as the negative controls, group 2 pigs (n = 14) were inoculated with PCV2, group 3 pigs (n = 12) were inoculated with PPV, groups 4 (n = 16) and 5 (n = 14) pigs were inoculated with both PCV2 and PPV. Pigs in groups 1-3 and 5 were vaccinated with two doses of a killed parvovirus-leptospira-erysipelothrix (PLE) vaccine prior to inoculation. The PCV2/PPV-coinfected pigs (groups 4 and 5) had significantly (P < 0.05) higher and more persistent fevers than the singular PCV2-infected pigs. One pig in each of the coinfected groups developed clinical disease (fever, respiratory disease, jaundice, weight loss) consistent with PMWS. Lymphoid depletion was significantly (P < 0.05) more severe in the dually-infected pigs at 42 days post-inoculation (DPI). Vaccinated, coinfected pigs (group 5) remained viremic significantly (P < 0.05) longer and had higher copy numbers of genomic PCV2 DNA in sera at 28, 35, and 42 DPI compared to the unvaccinated coinfected pigs (group 4). PPV-viremia was detected only in the unvaccinated group 4 pigs. PLE-vaccination prevented PPV-viremia but did not prevent clinical PMWS or reduce the severity of lymphoid depletion in PCV2/PPV-coinfected pigs. Evidence of increased incidence of clinical PMWS due to vaccination was not observed in this model. SN - 0378-1135 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15036529/Effect_of_porcine_parvovirus_vaccination_on_the_development_of_PMWS_in_segregated_early_weaned_pigs_coinfected_with_type_2_porcine_circovirus_and_porcine_parvovirus_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378113503003778 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -