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Social context and adolescent health behavior: does school-level smoking prevalence affect students' subsequent smoking behavior?
J Health Soc Behav. 2003 Dec; 44(4):525-35.JH

Abstract

This paper examines the links between individual adolescent smoking behavior and actual and perceived smoking behavior in the individual's school cohort. We hypothesized that students enrolled in schools with higher smoking prevalence among students in their grade are more likely to smoke subsequently. We also expected perceived school-level prevalence of smoking to have a greater impact than actual prevalence because the former is a more direct measure of perceived norms. Adjusting for demographics, actual school-level prevalence at baseline (grade 7) was strongly associated with smoking frequency one year later. However, the association disappeared after adjusting for individual smoking frequency at baseline. School-level prevalence did not moderate the association between individual's baseline and subsequent smoking frequency. Perceived prevalence of smoking among grade 8 students and two measures tapping the behavior of smaller peer groups--cigarette offers and exposure to friends and other peers who smoke--were associated with increased risk of smoking.

Authors+Show Affiliations

RAND, 1700 Main Street, P.O. Box 2138, Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15038147

Citation

Ellickson, Phyllis L., et al. "Social Context and Adolescent Health Behavior: Does School-level Smoking Prevalence Affect Students' Subsequent Smoking Behavior?" Journal of Health and Social Behavior, vol. 44, no. 4, 2003, pp. 525-35.
Ellickson PL, Bird CE, Orlando M, et al. Social context and adolescent health behavior: does school-level smoking prevalence affect students' subsequent smoking behavior? J Health Soc Behav. 2003;44(4):525-35.
Ellickson, P. L., Bird, C. E., Orlando, M., Klein, D. J., & McCaffrey, D. F. (2003). Social context and adolescent health behavior: does school-level smoking prevalence affect students' subsequent smoking behavior? Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 44(4), 525-35.
Ellickson PL, et al. Social Context and Adolescent Health Behavior: Does School-level Smoking Prevalence Affect Students' Subsequent Smoking Behavior. J Health Soc Behav. 2003;44(4):525-35. PubMed PMID: 15038147.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social context and adolescent health behavior: does school-level smoking prevalence affect students' subsequent smoking behavior? AU - Ellickson,Phyllis L, AU - Bird,Chloe E, AU - Orlando,Maria, AU - Klein,David J, AU - McCaffrey,Daniel F, PY - 2004/3/25/pubmed PY - 2004/4/3/medline PY - 2004/3/25/entrez SP - 525 EP - 35 JF - Journal of health and social behavior JO - J Health Soc Behav VL - 44 IS - 4 N2 - This paper examines the links between individual adolescent smoking behavior and actual and perceived smoking behavior in the individual's school cohort. We hypothesized that students enrolled in schools with higher smoking prevalence among students in their grade are more likely to smoke subsequently. We also expected perceived school-level prevalence of smoking to have a greater impact than actual prevalence because the former is a more direct measure of perceived norms. Adjusting for demographics, actual school-level prevalence at baseline (grade 7) was strongly associated with smoking frequency one year later. However, the association disappeared after adjusting for individual smoking frequency at baseline. School-level prevalence did not moderate the association between individual's baseline and subsequent smoking frequency. Perceived prevalence of smoking among grade 8 students and two measures tapping the behavior of smaller peer groups--cigarette offers and exposure to friends and other peers who smoke--were associated with increased risk of smoking. SN - 0022-1465 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15038147/Social_context_and_adolescent_health_behavior:_does_school_level_smoking_prevalence_affect_students'_subsequent_smoking_behavior L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/smokingandyouth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -