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New views of male pelvic anatomy: role of computer-generated 3D images.
Clin Anat. 2004 Apr; 17(3):261-71.CA

Abstract

There is considerable controversy concerning the role of cadaveric dissection in teaching gross anatomy and the potential of using 3D computer-generated images to substitute for actual laboratory dissections. There are currently few high-quality 3D virtual models of anatomy available to evaluate the utility of computer-generated images. Existing 3D models are frequently of structures that are easily examined in three dimensions by removal from the cadaver, i.e., the heart, skull, and brain. We have focused on developing a 3D model of the pelvis, a region that is conceptually difficult and relatively inaccessible for student dissection. We feel students will benefit tremendously from 3D views of the pelvic anatomy. We generated 3D models of the male pelvic anatomy from hand-segmented color Visible Human Male cryosection data, reconstructed and visualized by Columbia University's in-house 3D Vesalius trade mark Visualizer.(1) These 3D models depict the anatomy of the region in a realistic true-to-life color and texture. They can be used to create 3D anatomical scenes, with arbitrary complexity, where the component anatomical structures are displayed in correct 3D anatomical relationships. Moreover, a sequence of 3D scenes can be defined to simulate actual dissection. Structures can be added in a layered sequence from the bony framework to build from the "inside-out" or disassembled much like a true laboratory dissection from the "outside-in." These 3D reconstructed anatomical models can provide views of the structures from new perspectives and have the potential to improve understanding of the anatomical relationships of the pelvic region (http://www.cellbiology.lsuhsc.edu/People/Faculty/Venuti_Figures/movie_index.html).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office of Scholarly Resources, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA. jvenut@lsuhsc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15042576

Citation

Venuti, Judith M., et al. "New Views of Male Pelvic Anatomy: Role of Computer-generated 3D Images." Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.), vol. 17, no. 3, 2004, pp. 261-71.
Venuti JM, Imielinska C, Molholt P. New views of male pelvic anatomy: role of computer-generated 3D images. Clin Anat. 2004;17(3):261-71.
Venuti, J. M., Imielinska, C., & Molholt, P. (2004). New views of male pelvic anatomy: role of computer-generated 3D images. Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.), 17(3), 261-71.
Venuti JM, Imielinska C, Molholt P. New Views of Male Pelvic Anatomy: Role of Computer-generated 3D Images. Clin Anat. 2004;17(3):261-71. PubMed PMID: 15042576.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - New views of male pelvic anatomy: role of computer-generated 3D images. AU - Venuti,Judith M, AU - Imielinska,Celina, AU - Molholt,Pat, PY - 2004/3/26/pubmed PY - 2004/9/24/medline PY - 2004/3/26/entrez SP - 261 EP - 71 JF - Clinical anatomy (New York, N.Y.) JO - Clin Anat VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - There is considerable controversy concerning the role of cadaveric dissection in teaching gross anatomy and the potential of using 3D computer-generated images to substitute for actual laboratory dissections. There are currently few high-quality 3D virtual models of anatomy available to evaluate the utility of computer-generated images. Existing 3D models are frequently of structures that are easily examined in three dimensions by removal from the cadaver, i.e., the heart, skull, and brain. We have focused on developing a 3D model of the pelvis, a region that is conceptually difficult and relatively inaccessible for student dissection. We feel students will benefit tremendously from 3D views of the pelvic anatomy. We generated 3D models of the male pelvic anatomy from hand-segmented color Visible Human Male cryosection data, reconstructed and visualized by Columbia University's in-house 3D Vesalius trade mark Visualizer.(1) These 3D models depict the anatomy of the region in a realistic true-to-life color and texture. They can be used to create 3D anatomical scenes, with arbitrary complexity, where the component anatomical structures are displayed in correct 3D anatomical relationships. Moreover, a sequence of 3D scenes can be defined to simulate actual dissection. Structures can be added in a layered sequence from the bony framework to build from the "inside-out" or disassembled much like a true laboratory dissection from the "outside-in." These 3D reconstructed anatomical models can provide views of the structures from new perspectives and have the potential to improve understanding of the anatomical relationships of the pelvic region (http://www.cellbiology.lsuhsc.edu/People/Faculty/Venuti_Figures/movie_index.html). SN - 0897-3806 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15042576/New_views_of_male_pelvic_anatomy:_role_of_computer_generated_3D_images_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.10233 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -