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Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis E virus among apparently healthy humans and pigs in Bali, Indonesia: Identification of a pig infected with a genotype 4 hepatitis E virus.
J Med Virol. 2004 May; 73(1):38-44.JM

Abstract

In Indonesia where hepatitis E virus (HEV) is believed to be highly endemic, only three outbreaks of HEV transmission have been documented to date in restricted areas (West Kalimantan and East Java). A total of 1,115 serum samples collected from apparently healthy individuals in Bali, Lombok, and Surabaya in Indonesia in 1996 where epidemic HEV transmissions have never been reported, were tested for IgG class antibodies to HEV (anti-HEV). In Bali, anti-HEV was detected in 20% (54/276) of the tested population, in remarkable contrast with 4% (17/446) in Lombok and 0.5% (2/393) in Surabaya. On the other hand, antibodies to hepatitis A virus were highly prevalent in all three regions (95% in Bali, 90% in Lombok, and 89% in Surabaya). Although the majority of the population in Indonesia is Moslem, Balinese people are mostly Hindu and have a habit of consuming pork. Therefore, serum samples were obtained from the 99 farm pigs in Bali and tested for anti-HEV and HEV RNA. The sera from 71 pigs (72%) were positive for anti-HEV and a 2-month-old pig had detectable HEV RNA. The swine HEV isolate recovered from the viremic pig was named SB66-Bali. The SB66-Bali isolate was most closely related to the genotype 4 isolates from China, India, Japan, and Taiwan, but shared only 82.6-90.0% identity in the common 241-412 nucleotides within open reading frame 2 (ORF2). These results indicate that a presumably indigenous HEV strain(s) is circulating in Bali, Indonesia and that HEV infection may occur via zoonosis even in developing countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Sanglah Hospital of Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15042646

Citation

Wibawa, I Dewa Nyoman, et al. "Prevalence of Antibodies to Hepatitis E Virus Among Apparently Healthy Humans and Pigs in Bali, Indonesia: Identification of a Pig Infected With a Genotype 4 Hepatitis E Virus." Journal of Medical Virology, vol. 73, no. 1, 2004, pp. 38-44.
Wibawa ID, Muljono DH, Mulyanto , et al. Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis E virus among apparently healthy humans and pigs in Bali, Indonesia: Identification of a pig infected with a genotype 4 hepatitis E virus. J Med Virol. 2004;73(1):38-44.
Wibawa, I. D., Muljono, D. H., Mulyanto, ., Suryadarma, I. G., Tsuda, F., Takahashi, M., Nishizawa, T., & Okamoto, H. (2004). Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis E virus among apparently healthy humans and pigs in Bali, Indonesia: Identification of a pig infected with a genotype 4 hepatitis E virus. Journal of Medical Virology, 73(1), 38-44.
Wibawa ID, et al. Prevalence of Antibodies to Hepatitis E Virus Among Apparently Healthy Humans and Pigs in Bali, Indonesia: Identification of a Pig Infected With a Genotype 4 Hepatitis E Virus. J Med Virol. 2004;73(1):38-44. PubMed PMID: 15042646.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis E virus among apparently healthy humans and pigs in Bali, Indonesia: Identification of a pig infected with a genotype 4 hepatitis E virus. AU - Wibawa,I Dewa Nyoman, AU - Muljono,David H, AU - Mulyanto,, AU - Suryadarma,I G A, AU - Tsuda,Fumio, AU - Takahashi,Masaharu, AU - Nishizawa,Tsutomu, AU - Okamoto,Hiroaki, PY - 2004/3/26/pubmed PY - 2004/6/3/medline PY - 2004/3/26/entrez SP - 38 EP - 44 JF - Journal of medical virology JO - J Med Virol VL - 73 IS - 1 N2 - In Indonesia where hepatitis E virus (HEV) is believed to be highly endemic, only three outbreaks of HEV transmission have been documented to date in restricted areas (West Kalimantan and East Java). A total of 1,115 serum samples collected from apparently healthy individuals in Bali, Lombok, and Surabaya in Indonesia in 1996 where epidemic HEV transmissions have never been reported, were tested for IgG class antibodies to HEV (anti-HEV). In Bali, anti-HEV was detected in 20% (54/276) of the tested population, in remarkable contrast with 4% (17/446) in Lombok and 0.5% (2/393) in Surabaya. On the other hand, antibodies to hepatitis A virus were highly prevalent in all three regions (95% in Bali, 90% in Lombok, and 89% in Surabaya). Although the majority of the population in Indonesia is Moslem, Balinese people are mostly Hindu and have a habit of consuming pork. Therefore, serum samples were obtained from the 99 farm pigs in Bali and tested for anti-HEV and HEV RNA. The sera from 71 pigs (72%) were positive for anti-HEV and a 2-month-old pig had detectable HEV RNA. The swine HEV isolate recovered from the viremic pig was named SB66-Bali. The SB66-Bali isolate was most closely related to the genotype 4 isolates from China, India, Japan, and Taiwan, but shared only 82.6-90.0% identity in the common 241-412 nucleotides within open reading frame 2 (ORF2). These results indicate that a presumably indigenous HEV strain(s) is circulating in Bali, Indonesia and that HEV infection may occur via zoonosis even in developing countries. SN - 0146-6615 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15042646/Prevalence_of_antibodies_to_hepatitis_E_virus_among_apparently_healthy_humans_and_pigs_in_Bali_Indonesia:_Identification_of_a_pig_infected_with_a_genotype_4_hepatitis_E_virus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.20059 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -