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Medical problems in the returning expatriate.
Clin Occup Environ Med 2004; 4(1):205-19CO

Abstract

Expatriates are at risk for a number of infectious diseases for which short-term travelers generally are not at risk. Returning expatriates should undergo a detailed physical examination and a basic set of laboratory tests; these tests should be tailored to their specific history and exposures. Febrile patients with an appropriate exposure history must be evaluated for malaria; other potential diagnoses may be determined by incubation period, geographic exposure, and associated symptoms. When evaluating an ill returned expatriate with fever, it is important to exclude malaria, typhoid, leishmaniasis, brucellosis, tuberculosis, HIV infection, and syphilis. Gastrointestinal irregularities in expatriates may be caused by a number of infectious and noninfectious causes, including intestinal helminthiasis, strongyloidiasis, schistosomiasis, liver flukes, and amebiasis. Eosinophilia in returned expatriates often is associated with an infectious process and should be evaluated. Many infections associated with long-term overseas deployment may include dermatologic manifestations, including filariasis and leishmaniasis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15043371

Citation

Hochberg, Natasha, and Edward T. Ryan. "Medical Problems in the Returning Expatriate." Clinics in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 4, no. 1, 2004, pp. 205-19.
Hochberg N, Ryan ET. Medical problems in the returning expatriate. Clin Occup Environ Med. 2004;4(1):205-19.
Hochberg, N., & Ryan, E. T. (2004). Medical problems in the returning expatriate. Clinics in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 4(1), pp. 205-19.
Hochberg N, Ryan ET. Medical Problems in the Returning Expatriate. Clin Occup Environ Med. 2004;4(1):205-19. PubMed PMID: 15043371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medical problems in the returning expatriate. AU - Hochberg,Natasha, AU - Ryan,Edward T, PY - 2004/3/27/pubmed PY - 2004/5/18/medline PY - 2004/3/27/entrez SP - 205 EP - 19 JF - Clinics in occupational and environmental medicine JO - Clin Occup Environ Med VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - Expatriates are at risk for a number of infectious diseases for which short-term travelers generally are not at risk. Returning expatriates should undergo a detailed physical examination and a basic set of laboratory tests; these tests should be tailored to their specific history and exposures. Febrile patients with an appropriate exposure history must be evaluated for malaria; other potential diagnoses may be determined by incubation period, geographic exposure, and associated symptoms. When evaluating an ill returned expatriate with fever, it is important to exclude malaria, typhoid, leishmaniasis, brucellosis, tuberculosis, HIV infection, and syphilis. Gastrointestinal irregularities in expatriates may be caused by a number of infectious and noninfectious causes, including intestinal helminthiasis, strongyloidiasis, schistosomiasis, liver flukes, and amebiasis. Eosinophilia in returned expatriates often is associated with an infectious process and should be evaluated. Many infections associated with long-term overseas deployment may include dermatologic manifestations, including filariasis and leishmaniasis. SN - 1526-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15043371/Medical_problems_in_the_returning_expatriate_ L2 - http://journals.elsevierhealth.com/retrieve/pii/S1526004603001456 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -