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Serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels modify the association between plasma levels of oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein and coronary artery disease in men.
Metabolism 2004; 53(4):423-9M

Abstract

We investigated the association among plasma levels of oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in a case-control study. Cases (n = 183, male [M]/female [F]:138/45, age: 64.9 +/- 10.6 years) were defined as patients with angiographically proven coronary atherosclerosis (>/=50% stenosis) and controls were subjects with normal coronary arteries (n = 74, M/F:36/38, age: 57.6 +/- 14.4 years). Plasma Ox-LDL levels were measured by a sensitive detection method using the monoclonal antibody DLH3. In women, both Ox-LDL and lipid variables were similar between cases and controls. In men, cases had significantly lower (P <.05) levels of HDL-C (39.1 +/- 10.3 v 42.8 +/- 10.9 mg/dL) and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I than controls, while the difference in Ox-LDL between cases and controls was not significant (1.05 +/- 0.79 and 0.83 +/- 0.65 ng/10 microg LDL protein, respectively). However, HDL-C levels interacted with the association between Ox-LDL levels and CAD in males: increased Ox-LDL levels were significantly associated with CAD after controlling for age when HDL-C levels were high, but were not associated with CAD when HDL-C levels were low, as assessed by a multiple logistic regression analysis. In addition, the combination of HDL-C and Ox-LDL levels was a better indicator for CAD in males than HDL-C levels alone (-2 log likelihood, 24.1 v 19.4) after controlling for age and conventional risk factors of CAD, while Ox-LDL levels were not significantly associated with CAD. HDL-C levels interact with the association between plasma Ox-LDL levels and CAD in men, and increased Ox-LDL levels are an indicator of CAD in male subjects with high HDL-C levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15045686

Citation

Zhang, Bo, et al. "Serum High-density Lipoprotein-cholesterol Levels Modify the Association Between Plasma Levels of Oxidatively Modified Low-density Lipoprotein and Coronary Artery Disease in Men." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 53, no. 4, 2004, pp. 423-9.
Zhang B, Bai H, Liu R, et al. Serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels modify the association between plasma levels of oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein and coronary artery disease in men. Metab Clin Exp. 2004;53(4):423-9.
Zhang, B., Bai, H., Liu, R., Kumagai, K., Itabe, H., Takano, T., & Saku, K. (2004). Serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels modify the association between plasma levels of oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein and coronary artery disease in men. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 53(4), pp. 423-9.
Zhang B, et al. Serum High-density Lipoprotein-cholesterol Levels Modify the Association Between Plasma Levels of Oxidatively Modified Low-density Lipoprotein and Coronary Artery Disease in Men. Metab Clin Exp. 2004;53(4):423-9. PubMed PMID: 15045686.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels modify the association between plasma levels of oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein and coronary artery disease in men. AU - Zhang,Bo, AU - Bai,Huai, AU - Liu,Rui, AU - Kumagai,Koichiro, AU - Itabe,Hiroyuki, AU - Takano,Tatsuya, AU - Saku,Keijiro, PY - 2004/3/27/pubmed PY - 2004/5/5/medline PY - 2004/3/27/entrez SP - 423 EP - 9 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metab. Clin. Exp. VL - 53 IS - 4 N2 - We investigated the association among plasma levels of oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in a case-control study. Cases (n = 183, male [M]/female [F]:138/45, age: 64.9 +/- 10.6 years) were defined as patients with angiographically proven coronary atherosclerosis (>/=50% stenosis) and controls were subjects with normal coronary arteries (n = 74, M/F:36/38, age: 57.6 +/- 14.4 years). Plasma Ox-LDL levels were measured by a sensitive detection method using the monoclonal antibody DLH3. In women, both Ox-LDL and lipid variables were similar between cases and controls. In men, cases had significantly lower (P <.05) levels of HDL-C (39.1 +/- 10.3 v 42.8 +/- 10.9 mg/dL) and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I than controls, while the difference in Ox-LDL between cases and controls was not significant (1.05 +/- 0.79 and 0.83 +/- 0.65 ng/10 microg LDL protein, respectively). However, HDL-C levels interacted with the association between Ox-LDL levels and CAD in males: increased Ox-LDL levels were significantly associated with CAD after controlling for age when HDL-C levels were high, but were not associated with CAD when HDL-C levels were low, as assessed by a multiple logistic regression analysis. In addition, the combination of HDL-C and Ox-LDL levels was a better indicator for CAD in males than HDL-C levels alone (-2 log likelihood, 24.1 v 19.4) after controlling for age and conventional risk factors of CAD, while Ox-LDL levels were not significantly associated with CAD. HDL-C levels interact with the association between plasma Ox-LDL levels and CAD in men, and increased Ox-LDL levels are an indicator of CAD in male subjects with high HDL-C levels. SN - 0026-0495 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15045686/Serum_high_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_levels_modify_the_association_between_plasma_levels_of_oxidatively_modified_low_density_lipoprotein_and_coronary_artery_disease_in_men_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S002604950300533X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -