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The three attentional networks: on their independence and interactions.
Brain Cogn 2004; 54(3):225-7BC

Abstract

The present investigation was aimed to the study of the three attentional networks (Alerting, Orienting, and Executive Function) and their interactions. A modification of the task developed by Fan, McCandliss, Sommer, Raz, and Posner (2002) was used, in which a cost and benefit paradigm was combined with a flanker task and an alerting signal. We obtained significant interactions as predicted. The alerting network seemed to inhibit the executive function network (a larger flanker-congruency effect was found on trials where an alerting signal had been previously presented). The orienting network influenced the executive function network in a positive way (the flanker effect was smaller for cued than for uncued trials). Finally, alertness increased orienting (the cueing effect was bigger after the alerting signal). This last result, taken together with previous findings, points to an influence in the sense of a faster orienting under alertness, rather than a larger one. These results offer new insight into the functioning of the attentional system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Psicología Experimental y Fisiología del Comportamiento, Facultad de Psicología, Universidad de Granada, Campus Universitario Cartuja s/n, Granada 18071, Spain. callejas@ugr.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15050779

Citation

Callejas, Alicia, et al. "The Three Attentional Networks: On Their Independence and Interactions." Brain and Cognition, vol. 54, no. 3, 2004, pp. 225-7.
Callejas A, Lupiáñez J, Tudela P. The three attentional networks: on their independence and interactions. Brain Cogn. 2004;54(3):225-7.
Callejas, A., Lupiáñez, J., & Tudela, P. (2004). The three attentional networks: on their independence and interactions. Brain and Cognition, 54(3), pp. 225-7.
Callejas A, Lupiáñez J, Tudela P. The Three Attentional Networks: On Their Independence and Interactions. Brain Cogn. 2004;54(3):225-7. PubMed PMID: 15050779.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The three attentional networks: on their independence and interactions. AU - Callejas,Alicia, AU - Lupiáñez,Juan, AU - Tudela,Pío, PY - 2004/02/12/accepted PY - 2004/3/31/pubmed PY - 2004/8/11/medline PY - 2004/3/31/entrez SP - 225 EP - 7 JF - Brain and cognition JO - Brain Cogn VL - 54 IS - 3 N2 - The present investigation was aimed to the study of the three attentional networks (Alerting, Orienting, and Executive Function) and their interactions. A modification of the task developed by Fan, McCandliss, Sommer, Raz, and Posner (2002) was used, in which a cost and benefit paradigm was combined with a flanker task and an alerting signal. We obtained significant interactions as predicted. The alerting network seemed to inhibit the executive function network (a larger flanker-congruency effect was found on trials where an alerting signal had been previously presented). The orienting network influenced the executive function network in a positive way (the flanker effect was smaller for cued than for uncued trials). Finally, alertness increased orienting (the cueing effect was bigger after the alerting signal). This last result, taken together with previous findings, points to an influence in the sense of a faster orienting under alertness, rather than a larger one. These results offer new insight into the functioning of the attentional system. SN - 0278-2626 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15050779/The_three_attentional_networks:_on_their_independence_and_interactions_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278262604000302 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -