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Folic acid use by women receiving routine gynecologic care.
Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Apr; 103(4):746-53.OG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Many health professional groups recommend folic acid supplementation for all women able to become pregnant. In this study, we document folic acid supplement use among a sample of women receiving routine gynecologic care.

METHODS

A short questionnaire was administered to 322 women aged 18-45 years who were seeking routine gynecologic care at participating clinics in Little Rock, Arkansas. Questions covered knowledge and use of folic acid supplements, pregnancy intention, and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Primary study outcomes were self-reported folic acid awareness, daily or weekly use of folic acid supplements, and intention to begin taking folic acid. Factors affecting study outcomes were examined individually by computing crude odd ratios and adjusted for other covariates using unconditional logistic regression.

RESULTS

Although 61.8% of women reported awareness of the association between folic acid and birth defects prevention, only 27.1% of these women, and 22.7% of all study participants, reported daily use of a folic acid supplement. Substantially more women (39.8%) were taking a folic acid supplement at least once per week. Age, race, educational level, folic acid awareness, marital status, pregnancy intent, and other preventive health behaviors were the most important predictors of compliance.

CONCLUSION

The results indicate a need for targeted interventions directed toward minority women, young women, and those of lower socioeconomic and educational status. The routine gynecologic visit is an ideal opportunity to counsel women of reproductive age to take folic acid daily.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

III

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas 72202-3591, USA. clevesmarioa@uams.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15051568

Citation

Cleves, Mario A., et al. "Folic Acid Use By Women Receiving Routine Gynecologic Care." Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 103, no. 4, 2004, pp. 746-53.
Cleves MA, Hobbs CA, Collins HB, et al. Folic acid use by women receiving routine gynecologic care. Obstet Gynecol. 2004;103(4):746-53.
Cleves, M. A., Hobbs, C. A., Collins, H. B., Andrews, N., Smith, L. N., & Robbins, J. M. (2004). Folic acid use by women receiving routine gynecologic care. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 103(4), 746-53.
Cleves MA, et al. Folic Acid Use By Women Receiving Routine Gynecologic Care. Obstet Gynecol. 2004;103(4):746-53. PubMed PMID: 15051568.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Folic acid use by women receiving routine gynecologic care. AU - Cleves,Mario A, AU - Hobbs,Charlotte A, AU - Collins,H Breck, AU - Andrews,Nancy, AU - Smith,Laura N, AU - Robbins,James M, PY - 2004/3/31/pubmed PY - 2004/5/13/medline PY - 2004/3/31/entrez SP - 746 EP - 53 JF - Obstetrics and gynecology JO - Obstet Gynecol VL - 103 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Many health professional groups recommend folic acid supplementation for all women able to become pregnant. In this study, we document folic acid supplement use among a sample of women receiving routine gynecologic care. METHODS: A short questionnaire was administered to 322 women aged 18-45 years who were seeking routine gynecologic care at participating clinics in Little Rock, Arkansas. Questions covered knowledge and use of folic acid supplements, pregnancy intention, and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Primary study outcomes were self-reported folic acid awareness, daily or weekly use of folic acid supplements, and intention to begin taking folic acid. Factors affecting study outcomes were examined individually by computing crude odd ratios and adjusted for other covariates using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Although 61.8% of women reported awareness of the association between folic acid and birth defects prevention, only 27.1% of these women, and 22.7% of all study participants, reported daily use of a folic acid supplement. Substantially more women (39.8%) were taking a folic acid supplement at least once per week. Age, race, educational level, folic acid awareness, marital status, pregnancy intent, and other preventive health behaviors were the most important predictors of compliance. CONCLUSION: The results indicate a need for targeted interventions directed toward minority women, young women, and those of lower socioeconomic and educational status. The routine gynecologic visit is an ideal opportunity to counsel women of reproductive age to take folic acid daily. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III SN - 0029-7844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15051568/Folic_acid_use_by_women_receiving_routine_gynecologic_care_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=15051568.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -