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What are the health effects of fat?
Eur J Nutr. 2004 Mar; 43 Suppl 1:I/6-11.EJ

Abstract

In order to answer the question which health benefits are to be expected from dietary fat, we have to differentiate between different kinds of fat with varying fatty acid composition. Saturated fatty acids are commonly judged to have a negative health impact as they lead to increased serum cholesterol levels and a higher risk of coronary heart disease. Therefore, all recommendations stress the importance to limit the intake of saturated fatty acids. Monounsaturated fatty acids, on the other hand, have a positive impact on the serum lipid profile, lead to decreased LDL-oxidation and favorably influence the metabolism of diabetics. However, it is essential that monounsaturated fatty acids be mainly supplied by plant oils like rape seed or olive oil and not by foods that are simultaneously rich in saturated fatty acids. Concerning polyunsaturated fatty acids, it is important to increase the supply of n-3 fatty acids (ratio of n-6:n-3: about 5:1) as there is substantial evidence for their protective effects. If the fatty acid composition of the diet is optimized, even a total dietary fat content of 35% of total energy intake can be adequate as long as there is enough physical activity and the diet is rich in plant-derived foods like vegetables, fruits, cereals, potatoes, beans and legumes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fachhochschule Münster, Fachbereich Oecotrophologie, Corrensstrasse 25, 48149 Münster, Germany. uwahrburg@fh-muenster.de

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15052493

Citation

Wahrburg, Ursel. "What Are the Health Effects of Fat?" European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 43 Suppl 1, 2004, pp. I/6-11.
Wahrburg U. What are the health effects of fat? Eur J Nutr. 2004;43 Suppl 1:I/6-11.
Wahrburg, U. (2004). What are the health effects of fat? European Journal of Nutrition, 43 Suppl 1, I/6-11.
Wahrburg U. What Are the Health Effects of Fat. Eur J Nutr. 2004;43 Suppl 1:I/6-11. PubMed PMID: 15052493.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What are the health effects of fat? A1 - Wahrburg,Ursel, PY - 2004/3/31/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/3/31/entrez SP - I/6 EP - 11 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 43 Suppl 1 N2 - In order to answer the question which health benefits are to be expected from dietary fat, we have to differentiate between different kinds of fat with varying fatty acid composition. Saturated fatty acids are commonly judged to have a negative health impact as they lead to increased serum cholesterol levels and a higher risk of coronary heart disease. Therefore, all recommendations stress the importance to limit the intake of saturated fatty acids. Monounsaturated fatty acids, on the other hand, have a positive impact on the serum lipid profile, lead to decreased LDL-oxidation and favorably influence the metabolism of diabetics. However, it is essential that monounsaturated fatty acids be mainly supplied by plant oils like rape seed or olive oil and not by foods that are simultaneously rich in saturated fatty acids. Concerning polyunsaturated fatty acids, it is important to increase the supply of n-3 fatty acids (ratio of n-6:n-3: about 5:1) as there is substantial evidence for their protective effects. If the fatty acid composition of the diet is optimized, even a total dietary fat content of 35% of total energy intake can be adequate as long as there is enough physical activity and the diet is rich in plant-derived foods like vegetables, fruits, cereals, potatoes, beans and legumes. SN - 1436-6207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15052493/What_are_the_health_effects_of_fat L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-004-1103-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -