Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dietary adherence in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial.

Abstract

This article describes adherence to a low-fat dietary pattern (less than 20% energy from fat, five or more fruit/vegetable and six or more grain servings daily) in Years 1 and 5 of the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial, which was designed to examine the effects of a low-fat dietary pattern on risk of breast and colorectal cancers and other chronic diseases in postmenopausal women. Participants were randomly assigned to a low-fat dietary intervention arm (40%, n=19,542) or a usual diet control arm (60%, n=29,294). Women in the intervention arm completed 18 group sessions during the first year, followed by quarterly annual maintenance sessions. Adherence was assessed as control minus intervention (C-I) group differences in percent total energy from fat as estimated by a food frequency questionnaire. Based on these self-reported dietary data, mean C-I was 10.9 percentage points of energy from fat at Year 1, decreasing to 9.0 at Year 5. Factors associated with poorer adherence were being older, being African American or Hispanic (compared with white), having low income, and being obese. Group session attendance was strongly associated with better dietary adherence. There are many limitations of self-reported dietary data, particularly related to social desirability and intervention-associated bias. Nonetheless, these data indicate that long-term dietary change was achieved in this clinical trial setting and reinforce the potential of the ongoing trial to answer questions of public health importance.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Diet, Fat-Restricted
    Dietary Fats
    Edible Grain
    Energy Intake
    Female
    Fruit
    Health Surveys
    Humans
    Longitudinal Studies
    Middle Aged
    Patient Compliance
    Postmenopause
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vegetables
    Women's Health

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15054353

    Citation

    Women's Health Initiative Study Group. "Dietary Adherence in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 104, no. 4, 2004, pp. 654-8.
    Women's Health Initiative Study Group. Dietary adherence in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(4):654-8.
    Women's Health Initiative Study Group. (2004). Dietary adherence in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 104(4), pp. 654-8.
    Women's Health Initiative Study Group. Dietary Adherence in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(4):654-8. PubMed PMID: 15054353.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary adherence in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial. A1 - ,, PY - 2004/4/1/pubmed PY - 2004/5/27/medline PY - 2004/4/1/entrez SP - 654 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 104 IS - 4 N2 - This article describes adherence to a low-fat dietary pattern (less than 20% energy from fat, five or more fruit/vegetable and six or more grain servings daily) in Years 1 and 5 of the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial, which was designed to examine the effects of a low-fat dietary pattern on risk of breast and colorectal cancers and other chronic diseases in postmenopausal women. Participants were randomly assigned to a low-fat dietary intervention arm (40%, n=19,542) or a usual diet control arm (60%, n=29,294). Women in the intervention arm completed 18 group sessions during the first year, followed by quarterly annual maintenance sessions. Adherence was assessed as control minus intervention (C-I) group differences in percent total energy from fat as estimated by a food frequency questionnaire. Based on these self-reported dietary data, mean C-I was 10.9 percentage points of energy from fat at Year 1, decreasing to 9.0 at Year 5. Factors associated with poorer adherence were being older, being African American or Hispanic (compared with white), having low income, and being obese. Group session attendance was strongly associated with better dietary adherence. There are many limitations of self-reported dietary data, particularly related to social desirability and intervention-associated bias. Nonetheless, these data indicate that long-term dietary change was achieved in this clinical trial setting and reinforce the potential of the ongoing trial to answer questions of public health importance. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15054353/Dietary_adherence_in_the_Women's_Health_Initiative_Dietary_Modification_Trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S000282230400015X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -