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Stress reactivity in 15-month-old infants: links with infant temperament, cognitive competence, and attachment security.
Dev Psychobiol. 2004 Apr; 44(3):157-67.DP

Abstract

In a sample of eighty-five 15-month-old infants, salivary cortisol was obtained prior to and following a potentially stressful episode in which the child was confronted with a stranger and with a frightening robot. Infant characteristics such as anger proneness, cognitive competence, and attachment security were expected to be related to cortisol reactivity during the stressful event. The results showed higher cortisol reactivity in more anger-prone infants and in infants with higher levels of cognitive development as assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (N. Bayley, 1969). Attachment security, assessed with the Attachment Q-Set (AQS; E. Waters, 1995), was found to moderate the relation between cognitive level and cortisol reactivity; the positive relation between cognitive development and cortisol response was found in only infants with low AQS security scores. The findings may have important implications for research in the development of self-regulation in humans as well as in studies with animals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Nijmegen, Montessorilaan 3, P. O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. H.J.A.vanBakel@uvt.nlNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15054884

Citation

van Bakel, Hedwig J A., and J Marianne Riksen-Walraven. "Stress Reactivity in 15-month-old Infants: Links With Infant Temperament, Cognitive Competence, and Attachment Security." Developmental Psychobiology, vol. 44, no. 3, 2004, pp. 157-67.
van Bakel HJ, Riksen-Walraven JM. Stress reactivity in 15-month-old infants: links with infant temperament, cognitive competence, and attachment security. Dev Psychobiol. 2004;44(3):157-67.
van Bakel, H. J., & Riksen-Walraven, J. M. (2004). Stress reactivity in 15-month-old infants: links with infant temperament, cognitive competence, and attachment security. Developmental Psychobiology, 44(3), 157-67.
van Bakel HJ, Riksen-Walraven JM. Stress Reactivity in 15-month-old Infants: Links With Infant Temperament, Cognitive Competence, and Attachment Security. Dev Psychobiol. 2004;44(3):157-67. PubMed PMID: 15054884.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stress reactivity in 15-month-old infants: links with infant temperament, cognitive competence, and attachment security. AU - van Bakel,Hedwig J A, AU - Riksen-Walraven,J Marianne, PY - 2004/4/1/pubmed PY - 2004/8/11/medline PY - 2004/4/1/entrez SP - 157 EP - 67 JF - Developmental psychobiology JO - Dev Psychobiol VL - 44 IS - 3 N2 - In a sample of eighty-five 15-month-old infants, salivary cortisol was obtained prior to and following a potentially stressful episode in which the child was confronted with a stranger and with a frightening robot. Infant characteristics such as anger proneness, cognitive competence, and attachment security were expected to be related to cortisol reactivity during the stressful event. The results showed higher cortisol reactivity in more anger-prone infants and in infants with higher levels of cognitive development as assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (N. Bayley, 1969). Attachment security, assessed with the Attachment Q-Set (AQS; E. Waters, 1995), was found to moderate the relation between cognitive level and cortisol reactivity; the positive relation between cognitive development and cortisol response was found in only infants with low AQS security scores. The findings may have important implications for research in the development of self-regulation in humans as well as in studies with animals. SN - 0012-1630 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15054884/Stress_reactivity_in_15_month_old_infants:_links_with_infant_temperament_cognitive_competence_and_attachment_security_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/dev.20001 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -