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Diet, diabetes and schizophrenia: review and hypothesis.
Br J Psychiatry Suppl 2004; 47:S102-5BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diabetes is more common in people with schizophrenia than in the general population.

AIMS

To explore the possible reasons for the association between diabetes and schizophrenia.

METHOD

Diet and other lifestyle factors in patients with schizophrenia were reviewed as risk factors for diabetes.

RESULTS

People with schizophrenia show features of the metabolic syndrome at the onset of illness, before treatment. They also eat a poor diet, take little exercise and have high rates of smoking. Food intake may be increased further by antipsychotic medication. Nutritional factors appear to have a key role in the development of diabetes in patients with schizophrenia and may also affect the outcome and severity of schizophrenia. A common pathway through which diet might contribute to the development of both diabetes and schizophrenia is proposed.

CONCLUSIONS

Lifestyle factors may influence outcomes in both diabetes and schizophrenia. Lifestyle interventions are the key to improving the long-term health of people with schizophrenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Swallownest Court Hospital, Aughton Road, Sheffield S26 4TH, UK. malcompeet@yahoo.com

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15056602

Citation

Peet, Malcolm. "Diet, Diabetes and Schizophrenia: Review and Hypothesis." The British Journal of Psychiatry. Supplement, vol. 47, 2004, pp. S102-5.
Peet M. Diet, diabetes and schizophrenia: review and hypothesis. Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2004;47:S102-5.
Peet, M. (2004). Diet, diabetes and schizophrenia: review and hypothesis. The British Journal of Psychiatry. Supplement, 47, pp. S102-5.
Peet M. Diet, Diabetes and Schizophrenia: Review and Hypothesis. Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2004;47:S102-5. PubMed PMID: 15056602.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet, diabetes and schizophrenia: review and hypothesis. A1 - Peet,Malcolm, PY - 2004/4/2/pubmed PY - 2004/6/25/medline PY - 2004/4/2/entrez SP - S102 EP - 5 JF - The British journal of psychiatry. Supplement JO - Br J Psychiatry Suppl VL - 47 N2 - BACKGROUND: Diabetes is more common in people with schizophrenia than in the general population. AIMS: To explore the possible reasons for the association between diabetes and schizophrenia. METHOD: Diet and other lifestyle factors in patients with schizophrenia were reviewed as risk factors for diabetes. RESULTS: People with schizophrenia show features of the metabolic syndrome at the onset of illness, before treatment. They also eat a poor diet, take little exercise and have high rates of smoking. Food intake may be increased further by antipsychotic medication. Nutritional factors appear to have a key role in the development of diabetes in patients with schizophrenia and may also affect the outcome and severity of schizophrenia. A common pathway through which diet might contribute to the development of both diabetes and schizophrenia is proposed. CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle factors may influence outcomes in both diabetes and schizophrenia. Lifestyle interventions are the key to improving the long-term health of people with schizophrenia. SN - 0960-5371 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15056602/full_citation L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=15056602.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -