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Knowledge and practice of foot care in people with diabetes.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2004 May; 64(2):117-22.DR

Abstract

AIM

To determine knowledge and practice of foot care in people with diabetes.

METHODS

A questionnaire was completed by patients in Middlesbrough, South Tees, UK. A knowledge score was calculated and current practice determined. Practices that put patients at risk of developing foot ulcers and barriers to good practice were identified. Patients at high risk of ulceration were compared to those at low risk.

RESULTS

The mean knowledge score was 6.5 (S.D. 2.1) out of a possible 11. There was a positive correlation between the score and having received advice on foot care (6.9 versus 5.4, P = 0.001). Deficiencies in knowledge included the inability to sense minor injury to the feet (47.3%), proneness to ulceration (52.4%) and effect of smoking on the circulation (44.5%). 24.6% (20.1-29.2) never visited a chiropodist, 18.5% (14.2-22.7) failed to inspect their feet and 83% (79.1-86.9) did not have their feet measured when they last purchased shoes. Practices that put patients at risk included use of direct forms of heat on the feet and walking barefoot. Barriers to practice of foot care were mainly due to co-morbidity. Those with high risk feet showed a higher (6.8) but not significant knowledge score compared to those at low risk (6.5) and their foot care practise was better.

CONCLUSION

The results highlight areas where efforts to improve knowledge and practice may contribute to the prevention of foot ulcers and amputation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Diabetes Research Group and Life Course and Paediatric Research Group, School of Clinical Medical Sciences, Medical School, Framlington Place, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15063604

Citation

Pollock, R D., et al. "Knowledge and Practice of Foot Care in People With Diabetes." Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, vol. 64, no. 2, 2004, pp. 117-22.
Pollock RD, Unwin NC, Connolly V. Knowledge and practice of foot care in people with diabetes. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2004;64(2):117-22.
Pollock, R. D., Unwin, N. C., & Connolly, V. (2004). Knowledge and practice of foot care in people with diabetes. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 64(2), 117-22.
Pollock RD, Unwin NC, Connolly V. Knowledge and Practice of Foot Care in People With Diabetes. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2004;64(2):117-22. PubMed PMID: 15063604.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Knowledge and practice of foot care in people with diabetes. AU - Pollock,R D, AU - Unwin,N C, AU - Connolly,V, PY - 2003/05/22/received PY - 2003/10/15/revised PY - 2003/10/23/accepted PY - 2004/4/6/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/4/6/entrez SP - 117 EP - 22 JF - Diabetes research and clinical practice JO - Diabetes Res Clin Pract VL - 64 IS - 2 N2 - AIM: To determine knowledge and practice of foot care in people with diabetes. METHODS: A questionnaire was completed by patients in Middlesbrough, South Tees, UK. A knowledge score was calculated and current practice determined. Practices that put patients at risk of developing foot ulcers and barriers to good practice were identified. Patients at high risk of ulceration were compared to those at low risk. RESULTS: The mean knowledge score was 6.5 (S.D. 2.1) out of a possible 11. There was a positive correlation between the score and having received advice on foot care (6.9 versus 5.4, P = 0.001). Deficiencies in knowledge included the inability to sense minor injury to the feet (47.3%), proneness to ulceration (52.4%) and effect of smoking on the circulation (44.5%). 24.6% (20.1-29.2) never visited a chiropodist, 18.5% (14.2-22.7) failed to inspect their feet and 83% (79.1-86.9) did not have their feet measured when they last purchased shoes. Practices that put patients at risk included use of direct forms of heat on the feet and walking barefoot. Barriers to practice of foot care were mainly due to co-morbidity. Those with high risk feet showed a higher (6.8) but not significant knowledge score compared to those at low risk (6.5) and their foot care practise was better. CONCLUSION: The results highlight areas where efforts to improve knowledge and practice may contribute to the prevention of foot ulcers and amputation. SN - 0168-8227 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15063604/Knowledge_and_practice_of_foot_care_in_people_with_diabetes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0168822703002833 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -