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Psychometric properties of optimism and pessimism: results from the Girls' Health Enrichment Multisite Studies.
Prev Med 2004; 38 Suppl:S69-77PM

Abstract

Background. This study investigated the relationships among optimism, pessimism, physical activity, and dietary behaviors among 8- to 10-year-old African-American girls in the Girls' Health Enrichment Multisite Studies (GEMS). Methods. Ninety-two girls were randomly assigned to a 12-week physical activity and diet intervention or comparison group and completed psychosocial assessments including the Youth Life Orientation Test (YLOT) of optimism and pessimism, physical performance self-concept, physical activity self-efficacy, physical activity outcome expectancies, and physical activity and sedentary preferences. Also, preferences for bottled water and sweetened beverages were assessed. Physical activity and dietary intake were assessed by self-report and parent-report at baseline and follow-up. Also, physical activity was objectively assessed by wearing an accelerometer for 3 days. The psychometric properties of the optimism-pessimism subscales were analyzed. Results. The measures of optimism and pessimism in children were reliable (r = 0.75-0.82). In the multiple regression analyses without the intervention interaction terms, pessimism was positively and significantly related to increases in MET-adjusted usual activity (P = 0.008) and sedentary behaviors (P = 0.0004). Additionally, a negative (P = 0.026) pessimism by intervention interaction term for MET-adjusted usual activity was found such that the intervention group had a lower change in physical activity per unit increase in pessimism compared to the control group.

CONCLUSIONS

Among 8- to 10-year-old African-American girls, pessimism was related to increased sedentary behaviors and usual activity. Previous studies have reported relationships between optimism and health-compromising behaviors. This study found that pessimism may positively or negatively influence efforts to increase health-promoting behaviors. Future research should confirm and clarify the meaning of these findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research (CHPPR), School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 77030, USA. wtaylor@sph.uth.tmc.edu

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15072861

Citation

Taylor, Wendell C., et al. "Psychometric Properties of Optimism and Pessimism: Results From the Girls' Health Enrichment Multisite Studies." Preventive Medicine, vol. 38 Suppl, 2004, pp. S69-77.
Taylor WC, Baranowski T, Klesges LM, et al. Psychometric properties of optimism and pessimism: results from the Girls' Health Enrichment Multisite Studies. Prev Med. 2004;38 Suppl:S69-77.
Taylor, W. C., Baranowski, T., Klesges, L. M., Ey, S., Pratt, C., Rochon, J., & Zhou, A. (2004). Psychometric properties of optimism and pessimism: results from the Girls' Health Enrichment Multisite Studies. Preventive Medicine, 38 Suppl, pp. S69-77.
Taylor WC, et al. Psychometric Properties of Optimism and Pessimism: Results From the Girls' Health Enrichment Multisite Studies. Prev Med. 2004;38 Suppl:S69-77. PubMed PMID: 15072861.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychometric properties of optimism and pessimism: results from the Girls' Health Enrichment Multisite Studies. AU - Taylor,Wendell C, AU - Baranowski,Tom, AU - Klesges,Lisa M, AU - Ey,Sydney, AU - Pratt,Charlotte, AU - Rochon,Jim, AU - Zhou,Ainong, PY - 2004/4/10/pubmed PY - 2004/7/23/medline PY - 2004/4/10/entrez SP - S69 EP - 77 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 38 Suppl N2 - UNLABELLED: Background. This study investigated the relationships among optimism, pessimism, physical activity, and dietary behaviors among 8- to 10-year-old African-American girls in the Girls' Health Enrichment Multisite Studies (GEMS). Methods. Ninety-two girls were randomly assigned to a 12-week physical activity and diet intervention or comparison group and completed psychosocial assessments including the Youth Life Orientation Test (YLOT) of optimism and pessimism, physical performance self-concept, physical activity self-efficacy, physical activity outcome expectancies, and physical activity and sedentary preferences. Also, preferences for bottled water and sweetened beverages were assessed. Physical activity and dietary intake were assessed by self-report and parent-report at baseline and follow-up. Also, physical activity was objectively assessed by wearing an accelerometer for 3 days. The psychometric properties of the optimism-pessimism subscales were analyzed. Results. The measures of optimism and pessimism in children were reliable (r = 0.75-0.82). In the multiple regression analyses without the intervention interaction terms, pessimism was positively and significantly related to increases in MET-adjusted usual activity (P = 0.008) and sedentary behaviors (P = 0.0004). Additionally, a negative (P = 0.026) pessimism by intervention interaction term for MET-adjusted usual activity was found such that the intervention group had a lower change in physical activity per unit increase in pessimism compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Among 8- to 10-year-old African-American girls, pessimism was related to increased sedentary behaviors and usual activity. Previous studies have reported relationships between optimism and health-compromising behaviors. This study found that pessimism may positively or negatively influence efforts to increase health-promoting behaviors. Future research should confirm and clarify the meaning of these findings. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15072861/Psychometric_properties_of_optimism_and_pessimism:_results_from_the_Girls'_Health_Enrichment_Multisite_Studies_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091743504000507 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -