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Improving malaria home treatment by training drug retailers in rural Kenya.
Trop Med Int Health. 2004 Apr; 9(4):451-60.TM

Abstract

Recent global malaria control initiatives highlight the potential role of drug retailers to improve access to early effective malaria treatment. We report on the findings and discuss the implications of an educational programme for rural drug retailers and communities in Kenya between 1998 and 2001 in a study population of 70,000. Impact was evaluated through annual household surveys of over-the-counter (OTC) drug use and simulated retail client surveys in an early (1999) and a late (2000) implementation area. The programme achieved major improvements in drug selling practices. The proportion of OTC anti-malarial drug users receiving an adequate dose rose from 8% (n = 98) to 33% (n = 121) between 1998 and 1999 in the early implementation area. By 2001, and with the introduction of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine group drugs in accordance with national policy, this proportion rose to 64% (n = 441) across the early and late implementation areas. Overall, the proportion of shop-treated childhood fevers receiving an adequate dose of a recommended anti-malarial drug within 24 h rose from 1% (n = 681) to 28% (n = 919) by 2001. These findings strongly support the inclusion of private drug retailers in control strategies aiming to improve prompt effective treatment of malaria.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Kenya Medical Research Institute-Wellcome Trust Collaborative Research Programme, Kilifi, Kenya. vmarsh@kilifi.mimcom.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15078263

Citation

Marsh, V M., et al. "Improving Malaria Home Treatment By Training Drug Retailers in Rural Kenya." Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH, vol. 9, no. 4, 2004, pp. 451-60.
Marsh VM, Mutemi WM, Willetts A, et al. Improving malaria home treatment by training drug retailers in rural Kenya. Trop Med Int Health. 2004;9(4):451-60.
Marsh, V. M., Mutemi, W. M., Willetts, A., Bayah, K., Were, S., Ross, A., & Marsh, K. (2004). Improving malaria home treatment by training drug retailers in rural Kenya. Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH, 9(4), 451-60.
Marsh VM, et al. Improving Malaria Home Treatment By Training Drug Retailers in Rural Kenya. Trop Med Int Health. 2004;9(4):451-60. PubMed PMID: 15078263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Improving malaria home treatment by training drug retailers in rural Kenya. AU - Marsh,V M, AU - Mutemi,W M, AU - Willetts,A, AU - Bayah,K, AU - Were,S, AU - Ross,A, AU - Marsh,K, PY - 2004/4/14/pubmed PY - 2004/7/9/medline PY - 2004/4/14/entrez SP - 451 EP - 60 JF - Tropical medicine & international health : TM & IH JO - Trop Med Int Health VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - Recent global malaria control initiatives highlight the potential role of drug retailers to improve access to early effective malaria treatment. We report on the findings and discuss the implications of an educational programme for rural drug retailers and communities in Kenya between 1998 and 2001 in a study population of 70,000. Impact was evaluated through annual household surveys of over-the-counter (OTC) drug use and simulated retail client surveys in an early (1999) and a late (2000) implementation area. The programme achieved major improvements in drug selling practices. The proportion of OTC anti-malarial drug users receiving an adequate dose rose from 8% (n = 98) to 33% (n = 121) between 1998 and 1999 in the early implementation area. By 2001, and with the introduction of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine group drugs in accordance with national policy, this proportion rose to 64% (n = 441) across the early and late implementation areas. Overall, the proportion of shop-treated childhood fevers receiving an adequate dose of a recommended anti-malarial drug within 24 h rose from 1% (n = 681) to 28% (n = 919) by 2001. These findings strongly support the inclusion of private drug retailers in control strategies aiming to improve prompt effective treatment of malaria. SN - 1360-2276 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15078263/Improving_malaria_home_treatment_by_training_drug_retailers_in_rural_Kenya_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2004.01223.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -