Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sexual dysfunction is common in women with lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence: results of a cross-sectional study.
Eur Urol. 2004 May; 45(5):642-8; discussion 648.EU

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women with urinary incontinence and/or lower urinary tract symptoms as compared to a general female population.

METHODS

We extensively evaluated 227 consecutive women (mean age 52; age range 19-66) complaining of urinary incontinence (UI) and/or lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) with a comprehensive history (including several validated questionnaires), a complete physical examination and a urodynamic multichannel evaluation. Two hundred and sixteen patients were eligible for sexual function investigation because 11 out of 227 (5%) were not interested in dealing with questions regarding their own sexuality and were thus excluded from the final evaluation results. A group of 102 age-matched women (mean age 54; age range 19-63) assessed for a yearly routine gynaecological evaluation and not complaining of urinary symptoms were enrolled as cross-sectional controls and investigated in accordance with the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI).

RESULTS

Sexual dysfunction was diagnosed in 99 out of 216 patients (46%). Of these, 34 (34%) reported hypoactive sexual desire, 23 (23%) reported sexual arousal disorder; 11 patients (11%) complained of orgasmic deficiency, and 44 (44%) suffered from sexual pain disorder (e.g., dyspareunia or non-coital genital pain). Women reporting low sexual desire commonly suffered from stress incontinence (47%). We found that 60% of the women with sexual arousal disorders and 61% of those with sexual pain disorders also complained of recurrent bacterial cystitis. Forty-six percent of those complaining of orgasmic phase difficulties also reported a troublesome urge incontinence. The FSFI values in both groups scored as follows (patients versus controls; median value; p value): desire: 2.0 vs. 3.2 (p<0.01); arousal: 2.8 vs. 3.6 (p=n.s.); lubrication: 3.2 vs. 4.4 (p=0.01); orgasm: 4.1 vs. 4.4 (p=n.s.); sexual satisfaction: 2.7 vs. 4.0 (p<0.01); sexual pain: 1.8 vs. 4.0 (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Women reporting UI or LUTS also complained of sexual dysfunctions in a significantly higher number than a general, healthy female population not complaining of urinary symptoms. Investigation of female sexuality is suggested for these patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Divisione di Urologia, University Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milano, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15082208

Citation

Salonia, Andrea, et al. "Sexual Dysfunction Is Common in Women With Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence: Results of a Cross-sectional Study." European Urology, vol. 45, no. 5, 2004, pp. 642-8; discussion 648.
Salonia A, Zanni G, Nappi RE, et al. Sexual dysfunction is common in women with lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence: results of a cross-sectional study. Eur Urol. 2004;45(5):642-8; discussion 648.
Salonia, A., Zanni, G., Nappi, R. E., Briganti, A., Dehò, F., Fabbri, F., Colombo, R., Guazzoni, G., Di Girolamo, V., Rigatti, P., & Montorsi, F. (2004). Sexual dysfunction is common in women with lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence: results of a cross-sectional study. European Urology, 45(5), 642-8; discussion 648.
Salonia A, et al. Sexual Dysfunction Is Common in Women With Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence: Results of a Cross-sectional Study. Eur Urol. 2004;45(5):642-8; discussion 648. PubMed PMID: 15082208.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sexual dysfunction is common in women with lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence: results of a cross-sectional study. AU - Salonia,Andrea, AU - Zanni,Giuseppe, AU - Nappi,Rossella E, AU - Briganti,Alberto, AU - Dehò,Federico, AU - Fabbri,Fabio, AU - Colombo,Renzo, AU - Guazzoni,Giorgio, AU - Di Girolamo,Valerio, AU - Rigatti,Patrizio, AU - Montorsi,Francesco, PY - 2003/11/24/accepted PY - 2004/4/15/pubmed PY - 2004/8/31/medline PY - 2004/4/15/entrez SP - 642-8; discussion 648 JF - European urology JO - Eur Urol VL - 45 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women with urinary incontinence and/or lower urinary tract symptoms as compared to a general female population. METHODS: We extensively evaluated 227 consecutive women (mean age 52; age range 19-66) complaining of urinary incontinence (UI) and/or lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) with a comprehensive history (including several validated questionnaires), a complete physical examination and a urodynamic multichannel evaluation. Two hundred and sixteen patients were eligible for sexual function investigation because 11 out of 227 (5%) were not interested in dealing with questions regarding their own sexuality and were thus excluded from the final evaluation results. A group of 102 age-matched women (mean age 54; age range 19-63) assessed for a yearly routine gynaecological evaluation and not complaining of urinary symptoms were enrolled as cross-sectional controls and investigated in accordance with the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). RESULTS: Sexual dysfunction was diagnosed in 99 out of 216 patients (46%). Of these, 34 (34%) reported hypoactive sexual desire, 23 (23%) reported sexual arousal disorder; 11 patients (11%) complained of orgasmic deficiency, and 44 (44%) suffered from sexual pain disorder (e.g., dyspareunia or non-coital genital pain). Women reporting low sexual desire commonly suffered from stress incontinence (47%). We found that 60% of the women with sexual arousal disorders and 61% of those with sexual pain disorders also complained of recurrent bacterial cystitis. Forty-six percent of those complaining of orgasmic phase difficulties also reported a troublesome urge incontinence. The FSFI values in both groups scored as follows (patients versus controls; median value; p value): desire: 2.0 vs. 3.2 (p<0.01); arousal: 2.8 vs. 3.6 (p=n.s.); lubrication: 3.2 vs. 4.4 (p=0.01); orgasm: 4.1 vs. 4.4 (p=n.s.); sexual satisfaction: 2.7 vs. 4.0 (p<0.01); sexual pain: 1.8 vs. 4.0 (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Women reporting UI or LUTS also complained of sexual dysfunctions in a significantly higher number than a general, healthy female population not complaining of urinary symptoms. Investigation of female sexuality is suggested for these patients. SN - 0302-2838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15082208/Sexual_dysfunction_is_common_in_women_with_lower_urinary_tract_symptoms_and_urinary_incontinence:_results_of_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0302283803006341 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -