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[Should sex specific differences in venous diseases be explained by pregnancies and hormone intake?].
Gesundheitswesen 2004; 66(3):170-4G

Abstract

AIM OF THE STUDY

Diseases of the venous system are among the most frequently occurring diseases in the German population. However, the last comprehensive population-based German data were obtained in 1979. Since then, diagnostic methods have improved substantially. Here, we examine the prevalence of venous diseases in women and their association with pregnancies and intake of hormones.

METHODS

We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study in Bonn and rural environments (Recruitment period: 11/2000 - 11/2001; response: 59 %; 3072 study participants (1350 men, 1722 women), 18 to 79 years of age; investigation: standardised medical history, physical examination, duplex sonography, photography and CEAP-classification of veins of the legs). The following definitions were used: 1) Varicosis: clinical classification C2-C6 (primary varicosis only, excluding those showing spider-bursts exclusively); 2) Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI): C3-C6. For women, the risk factors examined were the number of pregnancies (P) and intake of hormones. Odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 %-CI) were calculated by multiple logistic regression (adjusted for age, region of residence and socioeconomic status). In addition, never pregnant women and men were compared regarding the two outcome variables.

RESULTS

713 participants (23 %) had varicosis and 522 (17 %) CVI. The OR for women (reference group: men) was OR = 1.4, 95 %-CI: 1.25 - 1.79 (varicosis) and OR = 1.2, 95 %-CI: 0.93 - 1.42 (CVI). There was a positive dose-response relationship between the number of pregnancies and varicosis: 1 P: OR = 1.3 (95 %-CI: 0.89 - 1.96), 2 P: OR = 1.4 (95 %-CI: 1.00 - 2.07), 3 P: OR = 1.6 (95 %-CI: 1.05 - 2.41), 4 P: OR = 1.9 (95 %-CI: 1.18 - 3.20), > or = 5 P: OR = 2.2 (95 %-CI: 1.28 - 3.74) and this trend was similar for CVI. Never-pregnant women (n = 518) and men had a similar prevalence. We did not see a consistent effect of intake of hormones in varicosis (OR = 0.9 [95 %-CI: 0.68 - 1.22]), but a negative association with CVI (OR = 0.6 [95 %-CI: 0.47 - 0.89]).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results confirm the known association between diseases of the venous system and pregnancies, which seem to explain a big share of the sex-specific differences in the prevalence of these diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen. katja.bromen@cec.eu.intNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

ger

PubMed ID

15088220

Citation

Bromen, K, et al. "[Should Sex Specific Differences in Venous Diseases Be Explained By Pregnancies and Hormone Intake?]." Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband Der Arzte Des Offentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany)), vol. 66, no. 3, 2004, pp. 170-4.
Bromen K, Pannier-Fischer F, Stang A, et al. [Should sex specific differences in venous diseases be explained by pregnancies and hormone intake?]. Gesundheitswesen. 2004;66(3):170-4.
Bromen, K., Pannier-Fischer, F., Stang, A., Rabe, E., Bock, E., & Jöckel, K. H. (2004). [Should sex specific differences in venous diseases be explained by pregnancies and hormone intake?]. Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband Der Arzte Des Offentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany)), 66(3), pp. 170-4.
Bromen K, et al. [Should Sex Specific Differences in Venous Diseases Be Explained By Pregnancies and Hormone Intake?]. Gesundheitswesen. 2004;66(3):170-4. PubMed PMID: 15088220.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Should sex specific differences in venous diseases be explained by pregnancies and hormone intake?]. AU - Bromen,K, AU - Pannier-Fischer,F, AU - Stang,A, AU - Rabe,E, AU - Bock,E, AU - Jöckel,K-H, PY - 2004/4/17/pubmed PY - 2004/8/19/medline PY - 2004/4/17/entrez SP - 170 EP - 4 JF - Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband der Arzte des Offentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany)) JO - Gesundheitswesen VL - 66 IS - 3 N2 - AIM OF THE STUDY: Diseases of the venous system are among the most frequently occurring diseases in the German population. However, the last comprehensive population-based German data were obtained in 1979. Since then, diagnostic methods have improved substantially. Here, we examine the prevalence of venous diseases in women and their association with pregnancies and intake of hormones. METHODS: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study in Bonn and rural environments (Recruitment period: 11/2000 - 11/2001; response: 59 %; 3072 study participants (1350 men, 1722 women), 18 to 79 years of age; investigation: standardised medical history, physical examination, duplex sonography, photography and CEAP-classification of veins of the legs). The following definitions were used: 1) Varicosis: clinical classification C2-C6 (primary varicosis only, excluding those showing spider-bursts exclusively); 2) Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI): C3-C6. For women, the risk factors examined were the number of pregnancies (P) and intake of hormones. Odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 %-CI) were calculated by multiple logistic regression (adjusted for age, region of residence and socioeconomic status). In addition, never pregnant women and men were compared regarding the two outcome variables. RESULTS: 713 participants (23 %) had varicosis and 522 (17 %) CVI. The OR for women (reference group: men) was OR = 1.4, 95 %-CI: 1.25 - 1.79 (varicosis) and OR = 1.2, 95 %-CI: 0.93 - 1.42 (CVI). There was a positive dose-response relationship between the number of pregnancies and varicosis: 1 P: OR = 1.3 (95 %-CI: 0.89 - 1.96), 2 P: OR = 1.4 (95 %-CI: 1.00 - 2.07), 3 P: OR = 1.6 (95 %-CI: 1.05 - 2.41), 4 P: OR = 1.9 (95 %-CI: 1.18 - 3.20), > or = 5 P: OR = 2.2 (95 %-CI: 1.28 - 3.74) and this trend was similar for CVI. Never-pregnant women (n = 518) and men had a similar prevalence. We did not see a consistent effect of intake of hormones in varicosis (OR = 0.9 [95 %-CI: 0.68 - 1.22]), but a negative association with CVI (OR = 0.6 [95 %-CI: 0.47 - 0.89]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm the known association between diseases of the venous system and pregnancies, which seem to explain a big share of the sex-specific differences in the prevalence of these diseases. SN - 0941-3790 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15088220/[Should_sex_specific_differences_in_venous_diseases_be_explained_by_pregnancies_and_hormone_intake]_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2004-813019 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -