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Keratoacanthoma as a postoperative complication of skin cancer excision.
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004 May; 50(5):753-8.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Keratoacanthomas usually occur spontaneously as a single rapidly growing tumor on sun-exposed skin. Multiple keratoacanthomas are rarely seen. Keratoacanthomas may also develop after trauma, laser resurfacing, radiation therapy, and at the donor site after skin grafting.

OBJECTIVE

We report 6 cases of keratoacanthomas that developed in and around healing and healed surgical sites after treatment of skin cancer. These tumors developed 1 to 3 months after surgery and were sometimes multiple.

METHODS

We performed follow-up examinations of patients' wounds after the treatment of skin cancer. Histological examination of nodules developing in the margins of healing wound sites and in the scars of healed wound sites after Mohs micrographic surgery revealed keratoacanthomas.

RESULTS

The tumors presented as a rapidly growing nodule or nodules, with the typical morphology and pathology of keratoacanthoma. One patient developed multiple keratoacanthomas at surgical and nonsurgical sites. These nodules were treated by a combination of excision, curettage and electrodesiccation, and oral isotretinoin, 4 mg/d.

CONCLUSION

Keratoacanthoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a rapidly growing nodule within or around the surgical site after skin cancer surgery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

DermSurgery Associates, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. Goldb1@dermsurgery.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15097960

Citation

Goldberg, Leonard H., et al. "Keratoacanthoma as a Postoperative Complication of Skin Cancer Excision." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 50, no. 5, 2004, pp. 753-8.
Goldberg LH, Silapunt S, Beyrau KK, et al. Keratoacanthoma as a postoperative complication of skin cancer excision. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004;50(5):753-8.
Goldberg, L. H., Silapunt, S., Beyrau, K. K., Peterson, S. R., Friedman, P. M., & Alam, M. (2004). Keratoacanthoma as a postoperative complication of skin cancer excision. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 50(5), 753-8.
Goldberg LH, et al. Keratoacanthoma as a Postoperative Complication of Skin Cancer Excision. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004;50(5):753-8. PubMed PMID: 15097960.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Keratoacanthoma as a postoperative complication of skin cancer excision. AU - Goldberg,Leonard H, AU - Silapunt,Sirunya, AU - Beyrau,Kathleen K, AU - Peterson,S Ray, AU - Friedman,Paul M, AU - Alam,Murad, PY - 2004/4/21/pubmed PY - 2004/6/21/medline PY - 2004/4/21/entrez SP - 753 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology JO - J Am Acad Dermatol VL - 50 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Keratoacanthomas usually occur spontaneously as a single rapidly growing tumor on sun-exposed skin. Multiple keratoacanthomas are rarely seen. Keratoacanthomas may also develop after trauma, laser resurfacing, radiation therapy, and at the donor site after skin grafting. OBJECTIVE: We report 6 cases of keratoacanthomas that developed in and around healing and healed surgical sites after treatment of skin cancer. These tumors developed 1 to 3 months after surgery and were sometimes multiple. METHODS: We performed follow-up examinations of patients' wounds after the treatment of skin cancer. Histological examination of nodules developing in the margins of healing wound sites and in the scars of healed wound sites after Mohs micrographic surgery revealed keratoacanthomas. RESULTS: The tumors presented as a rapidly growing nodule or nodules, with the typical morphology and pathology of keratoacanthoma. One patient developed multiple keratoacanthomas at surgical and nonsurgical sites. These nodules were treated by a combination of excision, curettage and electrodesiccation, and oral isotretinoin, 4 mg/d. CONCLUSION: Keratoacanthoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a rapidly growing nodule within or around the surgical site after skin cancer surgery. SN - 0190-9622 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15097960/Keratoacanthoma_as_a_postoperative_complication_of_skin_cancer_excision_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -