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Fast, but error-prone, responses during acute alcohol intoxication: effects of stimulus-response mapping complexity.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2004 Apr; 28(4):643-9.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although moderate doses of alcohol can impair performance on tasks that require information processing, little is known about the locus of the alcohol effects within the processing stream. This study used a psychological refractory period paradigm to investigate the effect of alcohol on the central, cognitive stage of information processing when task complexity is manipulated by altering stimulus-response compatibility.

METHODS

Thirty-four healthy male social drinkers were assigned to one of two groups (n = 17) that performed two tasks. Each trial consisted of a task 1 stimulus (tone) followed by a task 2 stimulus (letter) that was presented after one of four stimulus onset asynchronies (50, 200, 500, or 1100 msec). A baseline test of performance was obtained before the groups received a beverage containing either 0.0 g/kg (placebo) or 0.65 g/kg alcohol. Both groups were retested when blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was increasing and was decreasing.

RESULTS

The alcohol group made significantly more errors in task 1 compared with their drug-free baseline measure during the ascending phase of the BAC curve, and error rates increased to a greater extent for the more complex arbitrary stimulus-response mapping condition. Moreover, this increase in errors continued unabated during the descending phase of the BAC curve. Increasing BACs also slowed performance (longer reaction time), but unlike errors, reaction time returned to drug-free baseline levels when BAC was decreasing.

CONCLUSIONS

The results provide evidence that an acute dose of alcohol can impair one aspect of the central, cognitive stages of information processing. The possibility that errors in information processing remain during decreasing BACs even after processing speed has returned to drug-free levels has important practical implications relating to the detrimental consequences of acute alcohol intoxication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. tschweizer@rotman-baycrest.on.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15100617

Citation

Schweizer, Tom A., et al. "Fast, but Error-prone, Responses During Acute Alcohol Intoxication: Effects of Stimulus-response Mapping Complexity." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 28, no. 4, 2004, pp. 643-9.
Schweizer TA, Jolicoeur P, Vogel-Sprott M, et al. Fast, but error-prone, responses during acute alcohol intoxication: effects of stimulus-response mapping complexity. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2004;28(4):643-9.
Schweizer, T. A., Jolicoeur, P., Vogel-Sprott, M., & Dixon, M. J. (2004). Fast, but error-prone, responses during acute alcohol intoxication: effects of stimulus-response mapping complexity. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 28(4), 643-9.
Schweizer TA, et al. Fast, but Error-prone, Responses During Acute Alcohol Intoxication: Effects of Stimulus-response Mapping Complexity. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2004;28(4):643-9. PubMed PMID: 15100617.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fast, but error-prone, responses during acute alcohol intoxication: effects of stimulus-response mapping complexity. AU - Schweizer,Tom A, AU - Jolicoeur,Pierre, AU - Vogel-Sprott,M, AU - Dixon,Mike J, PY - 2004/4/22/pubmed PY - 2004/7/24/medline PY - 2004/4/22/entrez SP - 643 EP - 9 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 28 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although moderate doses of alcohol can impair performance on tasks that require information processing, little is known about the locus of the alcohol effects within the processing stream. This study used a psychological refractory period paradigm to investigate the effect of alcohol on the central, cognitive stage of information processing when task complexity is manipulated by altering stimulus-response compatibility. METHODS: Thirty-four healthy male social drinkers were assigned to one of two groups (n = 17) that performed two tasks. Each trial consisted of a task 1 stimulus (tone) followed by a task 2 stimulus (letter) that was presented after one of four stimulus onset asynchronies (50, 200, 500, or 1100 msec). A baseline test of performance was obtained before the groups received a beverage containing either 0.0 g/kg (placebo) or 0.65 g/kg alcohol. Both groups were retested when blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was increasing and was decreasing. RESULTS: The alcohol group made significantly more errors in task 1 compared with their drug-free baseline measure during the ascending phase of the BAC curve, and error rates increased to a greater extent for the more complex arbitrary stimulus-response mapping condition. Moreover, this increase in errors continued unabated during the descending phase of the BAC curve. Increasing BACs also slowed performance (longer reaction time), but unlike errors, reaction time returned to drug-free baseline levels when BAC was decreasing. CONCLUSIONS: The results provide evidence that an acute dose of alcohol can impair one aspect of the central, cognitive stages of information processing. The possibility that errors in information processing remain during decreasing BACs even after processing speed has returned to drug-free levels has important practical implications relating to the detrimental consequences of acute alcohol intoxication. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15100617/Fast_but_error_prone_responses_during_acute_alcohol_intoxication:_effects_of_stimulus_response_mapping_complexity_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=15100617.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -