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Trehalose is required for growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis.
J Biol Chem 2004; 279(28):28835-43JB

Abstract

Mycobacteria contain high levels of the disaccharide trehalose in free form as well as within various immunologically relevant glycolipids such as cord factor and sulfolipid-1. By contrast, most bacteria use trehalose solely as a general osmoprotectant or thermoprotectant. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis possess three pathways for the synthesis of trehalose. Most bacteria possess only one trehalose biosynthesis pathway and do not elaborate the disaccharide into more complex metabolites, suggesting a distinct role for trehalose in mycobacteria. We disabled key enzymes required for each of the three pathways in M. smegmatis by allelic replacement. The resulting trehalose biosynthesis mutant was unable to proliferate and enter stationary phase unless supplemented with trehalose. At elevated temperatures, however, the mutant was unable to proliferate even in the presence of trehalose. Genetic complementation experiments showed that each of the three pathways was able to recover the mutant in the absence of trehalose, even at elevated temperatures. From a panel of trehalose analogs, only those with the native alpha,alpha-(1,1) anomeric stereochemistry rescued the mutant, whereas alternate stereoisomers and general osmo- and thermoprotectants were inactive. These findings suggest a dual role for trehalose as both a thermoprotectant and a precursor of critical cell wall metabolites.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Chemistry and Molecular, School of Public Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15102847

Citation

Woodruff, Peter J., et al. "Trehalose Is Required for Growth of Mycobacterium Smegmatis." The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 279, no. 28, 2004, pp. 28835-43.
Woodruff PJ, Carlson BL, Siridechadilok B, et al. Trehalose is required for growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis. J Biol Chem. 2004;279(28):28835-43.
Woodruff, P. J., Carlson, B. L., Siridechadilok, B., Pratt, M. R., Senaratne, R. H., Mougous, J. D., ... Bertozzi, C. R. (2004). Trehalose is required for growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 279(28), pp. 28835-43.
Woodruff PJ, et al. Trehalose Is Required for Growth of Mycobacterium Smegmatis. J Biol Chem. 2004 Jul 9;279(28):28835-43. PubMed PMID: 15102847.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trehalose is required for growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis. AU - Woodruff,Peter J, AU - Carlson,Brian L, AU - Siridechadilok,Bunpote, AU - Pratt,Matthew R, AU - Senaratne,Ryan H, AU - Mougous,Joseph D, AU - Riley,Lee W, AU - Williams,Spencer J, AU - Bertozzi,Carolyn R, Y1 - 2004/04/21/ PY - 2004/4/23/pubmed PY - 2004/8/25/medline PY - 2004/4/23/entrez SP - 28835 EP - 43 JF - The Journal of biological chemistry JO - J. Biol. Chem. VL - 279 IS - 28 N2 - Mycobacteria contain high levels of the disaccharide trehalose in free form as well as within various immunologically relevant glycolipids such as cord factor and sulfolipid-1. By contrast, most bacteria use trehalose solely as a general osmoprotectant or thermoprotectant. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis possess three pathways for the synthesis of trehalose. Most bacteria possess only one trehalose biosynthesis pathway and do not elaborate the disaccharide into more complex metabolites, suggesting a distinct role for trehalose in mycobacteria. We disabled key enzymes required for each of the three pathways in M. smegmatis by allelic replacement. The resulting trehalose biosynthesis mutant was unable to proliferate and enter stationary phase unless supplemented with trehalose. At elevated temperatures, however, the mutant was unable to proliferate even in the presence of trehalose. Genetic complementation experiments showed that each of the three pathways was able to recover the mutant in the absence of trehalose, even at elevated temperatures. From a panel of trehalose analogs, only those with the native alpha,alpha-(1,1) anomeric stereochemistry rescued the mutant, whereas alternate stereoisomers and general osmo- and thermoprotectants were inactive. These findings suggest a dual role for trehalose as both a thermoprotectant and a precursor of critical cell wall metabolites. SN - 0021-9258 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15102847/Trehalose_is_required_for_growth_of_Mycobacterium_smegmatis_ L2 - http://www.jbc.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15102847 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -