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Treatment challenges and safety considerations for antipsychotic use in children and adolescents with psychoses.
J Clin Psychiatry. 2004; 65 Suppl 6:20-9.JC

Abstract

With increased prescribing of psychotropic medications to children and adolescents, more attention should be given to the safety and tolerability of these drugs in this population. Compared with adults, children are especially vulnerable to adverse effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), sedation, weight gain, and prolactin elevation. The prevalence of EPS is much higher in children treated with conventional antipsychotics than in those given atypical antipsychotics. Sedation, which can be minimized through gradual dose escalation, is common with risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. The relative propensities for producing weight gain in children and adolescents are olanzapine > risperidone > quetiapine. All conventional and some atypical antipsychotics (e.g., risperidone) increase serum prolactin levels. Nonetheless, preclinical studies suggest that atypical antipsychotics may have neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system; further studies, especially in children and adolescents, are required to confirm these results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45267-0559, USA. mcconvbj@email.uc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15104523

Citation

McConville, Brian J., and Michael T. Sorter. "Treatment Challenges and Safety Considerations for Antipsychotic Use in Children and Adolescents With Psychoses." The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 65 Suppl 6, 2004, pp. 20-9.
McConville BJ, Sorter MT. Treatment challenges and safety considerations for antipsychotic use in children and adolescents with psychoses. J Clin Psychiatry. 2004;65 Suppl 6:20-9.
McConville, B. J., & Sorter, M. T. (2004). Treatment challenges and safety considerations for antipsychotic use in children and adolescents with psychoses. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65 Suppl 6, 20-9.
McConville BJ, Sorter MT. Treatment Challenges and Safety Considerations for Antipsychotic Use in Children and Adolescents With Psychoses. J Clin Psychiatry. 2004;65 Suppl 6:20-9. PubMed PMID: 15104523.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment challenges and safety considerations for antipsychotic use in children and adolescents with psychoses. AU - McConville,Brian J, AU - Sorter,Michael T, PY - 2004/4/24/pubmed PY - 2004/5/27/medline PY - 2004/4/24/entrez SP - 20 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of clinical psychiatry JO - J Clin Psychiatry VL - 65 Suppl 6 N2 - With increased prescribing of psychotropic medications to children and adolescents, more attention should be given to the safety and tolerability of these drugs in this population. Compared with adults, children are especially vulnerable to adverse effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), sedation, weight gain, and prolactin elevation. The prevalence of EPS is much higher in children treated with conventional antipsychotics than in those given atypical antipsychotics. Sedation, which can be minimized through gradual dose escalation, is common with risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. The relative propensities for producing weight gain in children and adolescents are olanzapine > risperidone > quetiapine. All conventional and some atypical antipsychotics (e.g., risperidone) increase serum prolactin levels. Nonetheless, preclinical studies suggest that atypical antipsychotics may have neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system; further studies, especially in children and adolescents, are required to confirm these results. SN - 0160-6689 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15104523/Treatment_challenges_and_safety_considerations_for_antipsychotic_use_in_children_and_adolescents_with_psychoses_ L2 - http://www.psychiatrist.com/jcp/article/pages/2004/v65s06/v65s0604.aspx DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -