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Ultrasonic hearing in humans: applications for tinnitus treatment.
Int Tinnitus J. 2003; 9(2):69-75.IT

Abstract

Masking of tinnitus is possible using high audio frequencies and low-frequency ultrasound. The mechanisms involved in reception and perception of both audio frequencies and ultrasound are identical, with the exception that ultrasound interacts with an intermediary site, the brain. We proposed brain ultrasonic demodulation as the means of place-mapping ultrasound on the first few millimeters of the basilar membrane. We present modeling and psychoacoustic data in support of this theory.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Otolaryngology and Emergency Medicine, Box 980168, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0168, USA. lenhardt@mail2.vcu.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15106276

Citation

Lenhardt, Martin L.. "Ultrasonic Hearing in Humans: Applications for Tinnitus Treatment." The International Tinnitus Journal, vol. 9, no. 2, 2003, pp. 69-75.
Lenhardt ML. Ultrasonic hearing in humans: applications for tinnitus treatment. Int Tinnitus J. 2003;9(2):69-75.
Lenhardt, M. L. (2003). Ultrasonic hearing in humans: applications for tinnitus treatment. The International Tinnitus Journal, 9(2), 69-75.
Lenhardt ML. Ultrasonic Hearing in Humans: Applications for Tinnitus Treatment. Int Tinnitus J. 2003;9(2):69-75. PubMed PMID: 15106276.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ultrasonic hearing in humans: applications for tinnitus treatment. A1 - Lenhardt,Martin L, PY - 2004/4/27/pubmed PY - 2004/8/10/medline PY - 2004/4/27/entrez SP - 69 EP - 75 JF - The international tinnitus journal JO - Int Tinnitus J VL - 9 IS - 2 N2 - Masking of tinnitus is possible using high audio frequencies and low-frequency ultrasound. The mechanisms involved in reception and perception of both audio frequencies and ultrasound are identical, with the exception that ultrasound interacts with an intermediary site, the brain. We proposed brain ultrasonic demodulation as the means of place-mapping ultrasound on the first few millimeters of the basilar membrane. We present modeling and psychoacoustic data in support of this theory. SN - 0946-5448 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15106276/Ultrasonic_hearing_in_humans:_applications_for_tinnitus_treatment_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9653 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -