Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Major depression is associated with lower omega-3 fatty acid levels in patients with recent acute coronary syndromes.
Biol Psychiatry. 2004 May 01; 55(9):891-6.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are intrinsic cell membrane components and closely involved in neurotransmission and receptor function. Lower omega-3 levels are associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), increases in cardiac events in CAD patients, and depression. We sought to examine relationships between depression and serum levels of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs in patients recovering from acute coronary syndromes (ACS).

METHODS

We carried out a case-control study of serum PUFA levels and current major depression in 54 age- and sex-matched pairs approximately 2 months following ACS.

RESULTS

Depressed patients had significantly lower concentrations of total omega-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and higher ratios of arachidonic acid (AA) to DHA, AA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and n-3 to n-6 than controls. There were no baseline differences in any potential risk or protective factors for depression.

CONCLUSIONS

Results are consistent with previous reports in depressed patients without CAD, and with literature concerning omega-3 levels and risk of CAD events. Dietary, genetic, and hormonal factors may all play a role in both depression and CAD. Both prospective studies and randomized trials are needed to help clarify the interrelationships.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15110732

Citation

Frasure-Smith, Nancy, et al. "Major Depression Is Associated With Lower Omega-3 Fatty Acid Levels in Patients With Recent Acute Coronary Syndromes." Biological Psychiatry, vol. 55, no. 9, 2004, pp. 891-6.
Frasure-Smith N, Lespérance F, Julien P. Major depression is associated with lower omega-3 fatty acid levels in patients with recent acute coronary syndromes. Biol Psychiatry. 2004;55(9):891-6.
Frasure-Smith, N., Lespérance, F., & Julien, P. (2004). Major depression is associated with lower omega-3 fatty acid levels in patients with recent acute coronary syndromes. Biological Psychiatry, 55(9), 891-6.
Frasure-Smith N, Lespérance F, Julien P. Major Depression Is Associated With Lower Omega-3 Fatty Acid Levels in Patients With Recent Acute Coronary Syndromes. Biol Psychiatry. 2004 May 1;55(9):891-6. PubMed PMID: 15110732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Major depression is associated with lower omega-3 fatty acid levels in patients with recent acute coronary syndromes. AU - Frasure-Smith,Nancy, AU - Lespérance,François, AU - Julien,Pierre, PY - 2003/09/19/received PY - 2004/01/07/revised PY - 2004/01/13/accepted PY - 2004/4/28/pubmed PY - 2008/2/26/medline PY - 2004/4/28/entrez SP - 891 EP - 6 JF - Biological psychiatry JO - Biol Psychiatry VL - 55 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are intrinsic cell membrane components and closely involved in neurotransmission and receptor function. Lower omega-3 levels are associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), increases in cardiac events in CAD patients, and depression. We sought to examine relationships between depression and serum levels of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs in patients recovering from acute coronary syndromes (ACS). METHODS: We carried out a case-control study of serum PUFA levels and current major depression in 54 age- and sex-matched pairs approximately 2 months following ACS. RESULTS: Depressed patients had significantly lower concentrations of total omega-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and higher ratios of arachidonic acid (AA) to DHA, AA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and n-3 to n-6 than controls. There were no baseline differences in any potential risk or protective factors for depression. CONCLUSIONS: Results are consistent with previous reports in depressed patients without CAD, and with literature concerning omega-3 levels and risk of CAD events. Dietary, genetic, and hormonal factors may all play a role in both depression and CAD. Both prospective studies and randomized trials are needed to help clarify the interrelationships. SN - 1873-2402 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15110732/Major_depression_is_associated_with_lower_omega_3_fatty_acid_levels_in_patients_with_recent_acute_coronary_syndromes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006322304001076 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -