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Neurodevelopmental effects of postnatal lead exposure at very low levels.
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2004 May-Jun; 26(3):359-71.NT

Abstract

This study is among the first to examine specific neurobehavioral deficits in children exposed at very low lead levels. A systematic analysis for the presence of a threshold of lead exposure was conducted. The sample consisted of 246 African American, inner-city children from whom blood lead concentrations were assessed at 7.5 years of age. The results consistently show neurobehavioral deficits in relation to low levels of lead in the areas of intelligence, reaction time, visual-motor integration, fine motor skills, attention, including executive function, off-task behaviors, and teacher-reported withdrawn behaviors. Effects were identified in the specific domains of attention, executive function, visual-motor integration, social behavior, and motor skills, which have been previously suggested as part of lead's "behavioral signature". Visual inspection of nonparametric regression plots suggested a gradual linear dose-response relation for most endpoints. No threshold discontinuity was evident. Regression analyses in which lead exposure was dichotomized at 10 microg/dl were no more likely to be significant than analyses dichotomizing exposure at 5 microg/dl. Given that associations were found between lead levels as low as 3 microg/dl for multiple outcomes, these data provide additional evidence that there is no apparent lower bound threshold for postnatal lead exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Room 460, 2751 E. Jefferson, Detroit, MI 48207, USA. lchiodo@med.wayne.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15113598

Citation

Chiodo, Lisa M., et al. "Neurodevelopmental Effects of Postnatal Lead Exposure at Very Low Levels." Neurotoxicology and Teratology, vol. 26, no. 3, 2004, pp. 359-71.
Chiodo LM, Jacobson SW, Jacobson JL. Neurodevelopmental effects of postnatal lead exposure at very low levels. Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2004;26(3):359-71.
Chiodo, L. M., Jacobson, S. W., & Jacobson, J. L. (2004). Neurodevelopmental effects of postnatal lead exposure at very low levels. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 26(3), 359-71.
Chiodo LM, Jacobson SW, Jacobson JL. Neurodevelopmental Effects of Postnatal Lead Exposure at Very Low Levels. Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2004 May-Jun;26(3):359-71. PubMed PMID: 15113598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neurodevelopmental effects of postnatal lead exposure at very low levels. AU - Chiodo,Lisa M, AU - Jacobson,Sandra W, AU - Jacobson,Joseph L, PY - 2003/11/19/received PY - 2003/11/19/revised PY - 2004/01/29/accepted PY - 2004/4/29/pubmed PY - 2004/6/23/medline PY - 2004/4/29/entrez SP - 359 EP - 71 JF - Neurotoxicology and teratology JO - Neurotoxicol Teratol VL - 26 IS - 3 N2 - This study is among the first to examine specific neurobehavioral deficits in children exposed at very low lead levels. A systematic analysis for the presence of a threshold of lead exposure was conducted. The sample consisted of 246 African American, inner-city children from whom blood lead concentrations were assessed at 7.5 years of age. The results consistently show neurobehavioral deficits in relation to low levels of lead in the areas of intelligence, reaction time, visual-motor integration, fine motor skills, attention, including executive function, off-task behaviors, and teacher-reported withdrawn behaviors. Effects were identified in the specific domains of attention, executive function, visual-motor integration, social behavior, and motor skills, which have been previously suggested as part of lead's "behavioral signature". Visual inspection of nonparametric regression plots suggested a gradual linear dose-response relation for most endpoints. No threshold discontinuity was evident. Regression analyses in which lead exposure was dichotomized at 10 microg/dl were no more likely to be significant than analyses dichotomizing exposure at 5 microg/dl. Given that associations were found between lead levels as low as 3 microg/dl for multiple outcomes, these data provide additional evidence that there is no apparent lower bound threshold for postnatal lead exposure. SN - 0892-0362 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15113598/Neurodevelopmental_effects_of_postnatal_lead_exposure_at_very_low_levels_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0892036204000212 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -