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Body-composition differences between African American and white women: relation to resting energy requirements.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 May; 79(5):780-6.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Body composition differs between African American (AA) and white women, and the resting metabolic rate (RMR) is likely to be lower in AA women than in white women.

OBJECTIVE

We tested 2 hypotheses: that AA women have a greater proportion of low-metabolic-rate skeletal muscle (SM) and bone than do white women and that between-race musculoskeletal differences are a function of body weight.

DESIGN

Hypothesis 1 was tested by comparing SM, bone, adipose tissue, and high-metabolic-rate residual mass across 22 pairs of matched AA and white women. Magnetic resonance imaging and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were used to partition weight into 4 components, and RMR was both calculated from tissue-organ mass and measured. Hypothesis 2 was evaluated by measuring SM, bone, fat, and residual mass in 521 AA and white women with the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry alone.

RESULTS

Hypothesis 1: AA women had greater SM (+/- SD group difference: 1.52 +/- 2.48 kg; P < 0.01) and musculoskeletal mass (1.72 +/- 2.66 kg; P < 0.01) than did white women. RMR calculated from body composition and measured RMR did not differ; RMR estimated by both approaches tended to be lower (approximately 160 kJ/d) in AA women than in white women. Hypothesis 2: SM was significantly correlated with weight, height, age, and race x weight interaction; greater SM in the AA women was a function of body weight.

CONCLUSIONS

Lower RMRs in AA women than in white women are related to corresponding differences in the proportions of heat-producing tissues and organs, and these race-related body-composition differences increase as a function of body weight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Obesity Research Center, St Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Weight Control Unit, 1090 Amsterdam Avenue, 14th Floor, New York, NY 10025, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15113715

Citation

Jones, Alfredo, et al. "Body-composition Differences Between African American and White Women: Relation to Resting Energy Requirements." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 79, no. 5, 2004, pp. 780-6.
Jones A, Shen W, St-Onge MP, et al. Body-composition differences between African American and white women: relation to resting energy requirements. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;79(5):780-6.
Jones, A., Shen, W., St-Onge, M. P., Gallagher, D., Heshka, S., Wang, Z., & Heymsfield, S. B. (2004). Body-composition differences between African American and white women: relation to resting energy requirements. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 79(5), 780-6.
Jones A, et al. Body-composition Differences Between African American and White Women: Relation to Resting Energy Requirements. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;79(5):780-6. PubMed PMID: 15113715.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body-composition differences between African American and white women: relation to resting energy requirements. AU - Jones,Alfredo,Jr AU - Shen,Wei, AU - St-Onge,Marie-Pierre, AU - Gallagher,Dympna, AU - Heshka,Stanley, AU - Wang,ZiMian, AU - Heymsfield,Steven B, PY - 2004/4/29/pubmed PY - 2004/5/27/medline PY - 2004/4/29/entrez SP - 780 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 79 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Body composition differs between African American (AA) and white women, and the resting metabolic rate (RMR) is likely to be lower in AA women than in white women. OBJECTIVE: We tested 2 hypotheses: that AA women have a greater proportion of low-metabolic-rate skeletal muscle (SM) and bone than do white women and that between-race musculoskeletal differences are a function of body weight. DESIGN: Hypothesis 1 was tested by comparing SM, bone, adipose tissue, and high-metabolic-rate residual mass across 22 pairs of matched AA and white women. Magnetic resonance imaging and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were used to partition weight into 4 components, and RMR was both calculated from tissue-organ mass and measured. Hypothesis 2 was evaluated by measuring SM, bone, fat, and residual mass in 521 AA and white women with the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry alone. RESULTS: Hypothesis 1: AA women had greater SM (+/- SD group difference: 1.52 +/- 2.48 kg; P < 0.01) and musculoskeletal mass (1.72 +/- 2.66 kg; P < 0.01) than did white women. RMR calculated from body composition and measured RMR did not differ; RMR estimated by both approaches tended to be lower (approximately 160 kJ/d) in AA women than in white women. Hypothesis 2: SM was significantly correlated with weight, height, age, and race x weight interaction; greater SM in the AA women was a function of body weight. CONCLUSIONS: Lower RMRs in AA women than in white women are related to corresponding differences in the proportions of heat-producing tissues and organs, and these race-related body-composition differences increase as a function of body weight. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15113715/Body_composition_differences_between_African_American_and_white_women:_relation_to_resting_energy_requirements_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/79.5.780 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -