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Dietary fiber and C-reactive protein: findings from national health and nutrition examination survey data.
J Nutr. 2004 May; 134(5):1181-5.JN

Abstract

A higher intake of dietary fiber may decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. We examined the association between dietary fiber and serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), a possible predictor of cardiovascular events, using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2000. Among 3920 participants > or = 20 y old, dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with serum CRP concentration. The odds ratio (OR) for increased CRP concentration (>3.0 mg/L) was 0.49 (95% CI 0.37-0.65; P for trend < 0.001) for the highest quintile of fiber intake compared with the lowest. Adjustment for age, gender, race, education, smoking, physical activity, BMI, total energy, and fat intake resulted in a slight attenuation (OR 0.59; CI 0.41-0.85; P for trend = 0.006). Excluding participants with cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, or cancer did not alter the results. Our findings indicate that fiber intake is independently associated with serum CRP concentration and support the recommendation of a diet with a high fiber content.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. uajani@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15113967

Citation

Ajani, Umed A., et al. "Dietary Fiber and C-reactive Protein: Findings From National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 134, no. 5, 2004, pp. 1181-5.
Ajani UA, Ford ES, Mokdad AH. Dietary fiber and C-reactive protein: findings from national health and nutrition examination survey data. J Nutr. 2004;134(5):1181-5.
Ajani, U. A., Ford, E. S., & Mokdad, A. H. (2004). Dietary fiber and C-reactive protein: findings from national health and nutrition examination survey data. The Journal of Nutrition, 134(5), 1181-5.
Ajani UA, Ford ES, Mokdad AH. Dietary Fiber and C-reactive Protein: Findings From National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data. J Nutr. 2004;134(5):1181-5. PubMed PMID: 15113967.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fiber and C-reactive protein: findings from national health and nutrition examination survey data. AU - Ajani,Umed A, AU - Ford,Earl S, AU - Mokdad,Ali H, PY - 2004/4/29/pubmed PY - 2004/6/21/medline PY - 2004/4/29/entrez SP - 1181 EP - 5 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 134 IS - 5 N2 - A higher intake of dietary fiber may decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. We examined the association between dietary fiber and serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), a possible predictor of cardiovascular events, using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2000. Among 3920 participants > or = 20 y old, dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with serum CRP concentration. The odds ratio (OR) for increased CRP concentration (>3.0 mg/L) was 0.49 (95% CI 0.37-0.65; P for trend < 0.001) for the highest quintile of fiber intake compared with the lowest. Adjustment for age, gender, race, education, smoking, physical activity, BMI, total energy, and fat intake resulted in a slight attenuation (OR 0.59; CI 0.41-0.85; P for trend = 0.006). Excluding participants with cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, or cancer did not alter the results. Our findings indicate that fiber intake is independently associated with serum CRP concentration and support the recommendation of a diet with a high fiber content. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15113967/Dietary_fiber_and_C_reactive_protein:_findings_from_national_health_and_nutrition_examination_survey_data_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/134.5.1181 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -