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Tobacco smoke exposure, wheeze, and atopy.
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2004 Jun; 37(6):492-8.PP

Abstract

We investigated the effect of in utero and postnatal environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure on respiratory symptoms and atopy in the first 3 years of life in children at high risk of allergic disease (both parents atopic). Three hundred and sixty-nine children were followed from birth and reviewed at ages 1 and 3 years (respiratory questionnaire, skin testing). Parental smoking questionnaires were administered, and plasma cotinine in cord and peripheral blood (at age 1 year) was measured (capillary column gas-liquid chromatography). Wheezing starting in the first year of life was significantly more common in children of smoking mothers (54.2% vs. 39.5%, P = 0.017), but not wheezing starting after age 1 year (10.8% vs. 10.9%, smoking and nonsmoking mothers, P = 0.99). Detectable cord cotinine was not associated with wheeze. More frequent wheeze in infancy was significantly more common in those with detectable 1-year cotinine (e.g., wheeze without colds, 17.8% vs. 5.6%, P = 0.02; wheeze most days, 6.5% vs. 0%, P = 0.04). ETS exposure was not associated with atopy. In the multivariate regression analysis, maternal smoking during pregnancy and/or in the first year of life remained associated with wheeze in the first year of life (odds ratio, 1.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-3.12; P = 0.01). ETS exposure in "high-risk" infants increases the risk of wheezing starting in the first year of life, but not after age 1 year. However, ETS exposure has little or no effect on the development of atopy. Measurement of plasma cotinine was no more useful than tobacco exposure assessment by questionnaire in our cohort.

Authors+Show Affiliations

North West Lung Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, UK. cmurray@fs1.with.man.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15114549

Citation

Murray, Clare S., et al. "Tobacco Smoke Exposure, Wheeze, and Atopy." Pediatric Pulmonology, vol. 37, no. 6, 2004, pp. 492-8.
Murray CS, Woodcock A, Smillie FI, et al. Tobacco smoke exposure, wheeze, and atopy. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2004;37(6):492-8.
Murray, C. S., Woodcock, A., Smillie, F. I., Cain, G., Kissen, P., & Custovic, A. (2004). Tobacco smoke exposure, wheeze, and atopy. Pediatric Pulmonology, 37(6), 492-8.
Murray CS, et al. Tobacco Smoke Exposure, Wheeze, and Atopy. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2004;37(6):492-8. PubMed PMID: 15114549.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tobacco smoke exposure, wheeze, and atopy. AU - Murray,Clare S, AU - Woodcock,Ashley, AU - Smillie,Frazer I, AU - Cain,Greg, AU - Kissen,Patricia, AU - Custovic,Adnan, AU - ,, PY - 2004/4/29/pubmed PY - 2004/9/1/medline PY - 2004/4/29/entrez SP - 492 EP - 8 JF - Pediatric pulmonology JO - Pediatr Pulmonol VL - 37 IS - 6 N2 - We investigated the effect of in utero and postnatal environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure on respiratory symptoms and atopy in the first 3 years of life in children at high risk of allergic disease (both parents atopic). Three hundred and sixty-nine children were followed from birth and reviewed at ages 1 and 3 years (respiratory questionnaire, skin testing). Parental smoking questionnaires were administered, and plasma cotinine in cord and peripheral blood (at age 1 year) was measured (capillary column gas-liquid chromatography). Wheezing starting in the first year of life was significantly more common in children of smoking mothers (54.2% vs. 39.5%, P = 0.017), but not wheezing starting after age 1 year (10.8% vs. 10.9%, smoking and nonsmoking mothers, P = 0.99). Detectable cord cotinine was not associated with wheeze. More frequent wheeze in infancy was significantly more common in those with detectable 1-year cotinine (e.g., wheeze without colds, 17.8% vs. 5.6%, P = 0.02; wheeze most days, 6.5% vs. 0%, P = 0.04). ETS exposure was not associated with atopy. In the multivariate regression analysis, maternal smoking during pregnancy and/or in the first year of life remained associated with wheeze in the first year of life (odds ratio, 1.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-3.12; P = 0.01). ETS exposure in "high-risk" infants increases the risk of wheezing starting in the first year of life, but not after age 1 year. However, ETS exposure has little or no effect on the development of atopy. Measurement of plasma cotinine was no more useful than tobacco exposure assessment by questionnaire in our cohort. SN - 8755-6863 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15114549/Tobacco_smoke_exposure_wheeze_and_atopy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.20019 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -