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Association between size at birth, truncal fat and obesity in adult life and its contribution to blood pressure and coronary heart disease; study in a high birth weight population.
Eur J Clin Nutr 2004; 58(5):812-8EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between size at birth and obesity as well as truncal fat, and its contribution to cardiovascular risk in a high birth weight population.

DESIGN

Cohort-study with retrospectively collected data on size at birth.

SETTING

Reykjavik, Iceland.

SUBJECTS

A total of 1874 men and 1833 women born in Reykjavik during 1914-1935.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Size at birth. Adult weight, height and skinfold thickness measurements, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (CHD).

RESULTS

Birth weight was positively related to adult body mass index (BMI) in both genders (B=0.35+/-0.14 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.015, P=0.012 and B=0.34+/-0.17 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.055, P=0.043 in men and women, respectively). However, high birth weight was not a risk factor for adult obesity (BMI>/=30 kg/m(2)). In the highest birth weight quartile, the odds ratio (95% CI) for being above the 90th percentile of truncal fat was 0.7 (0.6-1.0, P=0.021) for men and 0.4 (0.3-0.8, P=0.002) for women, compared with the lowest birth weight quartile. Truncal fat and BMI were positively related to blood pressure in both genders (P<0.05), but not to CHD. The regression coefficient for the inverse association between birth weight and blood pressure hardly changed when adding truncal fat to the model.

CONCLUSION

In this high birth weight population, high birth weight was related to higher BMI in adulthood without being a risk factor for adult obesity. The inverse association between birth weight and truncal fat in adulthood suggests a role for foetal development in determining adult fat distribution. The inverse relationship of birth weight to blood pressure seems not to be mediated through the same pathway as to truncal fat.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-University Hospital, Iceland. ingigun@landspitali.isNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15116085

Citation

Gunnarsdottir, I, et al. "Association Between Size at Birth, Truncal Fat and Obesity in Adult Life and Its Contribution to Blood Pressure and Coronary Heart Disease; Study in a High Birth Weight Population." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 58, no. 5, 2004, pp. 812-8.
Gunnarsdottir I, Birgisdottir BE, Benediktsson R, et al. Association between size at birth, truncal fat and obesity in adult life and its contribution to blood pressure and coronary heart disease; study in a high birth weight population. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004;58(5):812-8.
Gunnarsdottir, I., Birgisdottir, B. E., Benediktsson, R., Gudnason, V., & Thorsdottir, I. (2004). Association between size at birth, truncal fat and obesity in adult life and its contribution to blood pressure and coronary heart disease; study in a high birth weight population. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 58(5), pp. 812-8.
Gunnarsdottir I, et al. Association Between Size at Birth, Truncal Fat and Obesity in Adult Life and Its Contribution to Blood Pressure and Coronary Heart Disease; Study in a High Birth Weight Population. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004;58(5):812-8. PubMed PMID: 15116085.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between size at birth, truncal fat and obesity in adult life and its contribution to blood pressure and coronary heart disease; study in a high birth weight population. AU - Gunnarsdottir,I, AU - Birgisdottir,B E, AU - Benediktsson,R, AU - Gudnason,V, AU - Thorsdottir,I, PY - 2004/4/30/pubmed PY - 2005/3/4/medline PY - 2004/4/30/entrez SP - 812 EP - 8 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 58 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between size at birth and obesity as well as truncal fat, and its contribution to cardiovascular risk in a high birth weight population. DESIGN: Cohort-study with retrospectively collected data on size at birth. SETTING: Reykjavik, Iceland. SUBJECTS: A total of 1874 men and 1833 women born in Reykjavik during 1914-1935. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Size at birth. Adult weight, height and skinfold thickness measurements, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (CHD). RESULTS: Birth weight was positively related to adult body mass index (BMI) in both genders (B=0.35+/-0.14 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.015, P=0.012 and B=0.34+/-0.17 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.055, P=0.043 in men and women, respectively). However, high birth weight was not a risk factor for adult obesity (BMI>/=30 kg/m(2)). In the highest birth weight quartile, the odds ratio (95% CI) for being above the 90th percentile of truncal fat was 0.7 (0.6-1.0, P=0.021) for men and 0.4 (0.3-0.8, P=0.002) for women, compared with the lowest birth weight quartile. Truncal fat and BMI were positively related to blood pressure in both genders (P<0.05), but not to CHD. The regression coefficient for the inverse association between birth weight and blood pressure hardly changed when adding truncal fat to the model. CONCLUSION: In this high birth weight population, high birth weight was related to higher BMI in adulthood without being a risk factor for adult obesity. The inverse association between birth weight and truncal fat in adulthood suggests a role for foetal development in determining adult fat distribution. The inverse relationship of birth weight to blood pressure seems not to be mediated through the same pathway as to truncal fat. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15116085/Association_between_size_at_birth_truncal_fat_and_obesity_in_adult_life_and_its_contribution_to_blood_pressure_and_coronary_heart_disease L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601881 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -