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Ecological genetics of abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila falleni: a pleiotropic link to nematode parasitism.
Evolution. 2004 Mar; 58(3):587-96.E

Abstract

Drosophila falleni belongs to the quinaria species group, whose species vary considerably in patterns of wing and abdominal pigmentation. Drosophila falleni itself exhibits substantial variation among wild flies in abdominal spotting patterns. A selection experiment revealed that natural populations of D. falleni harbor high levels of genetic variation for spot number: in 10 generations of selection modal spot number within populations declined from 18 (the modal number in wild-caught females) to as low as zero. Rearing flies at different temperatures shows that some of the variation among wild flies is likely to reflect variation in the environmental conditions under which they developed. Fitness assays did not reveal any cost of reduced spot number with respect to development time, adult survival, or female fecundity. However, spotless flies were almost twice as susceptible to infection by the nematode parasite Howardula aoronymphium. Thus, selection exerted by nematode parasites may influence pigmentation patterns and other, genetically correlated traits in natural populations D. falleni.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15119442

Citation

Dombeck, Irene, and John Jaenike. "Ecological Genetics of Abdominal Pigmentation in Drosophila Falleni: a Pleiotropic Link to Nematode Parasitism." Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution, vol. 58, no. 3, 2004, pp. 587-96.
Dombeck I, Jaenike J. Ecological genetics of abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila falleni: a pleiotropic link to nematode parasitism. Evolution. 2004;58(3):587-96.
Dombeck, I., & Jaenike, J. (2004). Ecological genetics of abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila falleni: a pleiotropic link to nematode parasitism. Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution, 58(3), 587-96.
Dombeck I, Jaenike J. Ecological Genetics of Abdominal Pigmentation in Drosophila Falleni: a Pleiotropic Link to Nematode Parasitism. Evolution. 2004;58(3):587-96. PubMed PMID: 15119442.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ecological genetics of abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila falleni: a pleiotropic link to nematode parasitism. AU - Dombeck,Irene, AU - Jaenike,John, PY - 2004/5/4/pubmed PY - 2004/6/3/medline PY - 2004/5/4/entrez SP - 587 EP - 96 JF - Evolution; international journal of organic evolution JO - Evolution VL - 58 IS - 3 N2 - Drosophila falleni belongs to the quinaria species group, whose species vary considerably in patterns of wing and abdominal pigmentation. Drosophila falleni itself exhibits substantial variation among wild flies in abdominal spotting patterns. A selection experiment revealed that natural populations of D. falleni harbor high levels of genetic variation for spot number: in 10 generations of selection modal spot number within populations declined from 18 (the modal number in wild-caught females) to as low as zero. Rearing flies at different temperatures shows that some of the variation among wild flies is likely to reflect variation in the environmental conditions under which they developed. Fitness assays did not reveal any cost of reduced spot number with respect to development time, adult survival, or female fecundity. However, spotless flies were almost twice as susceptible to infection by the nematode parasite Howardula aoronymphium. Thus, selection exerted by nematode parasites may influence pigmentation patterns and other, genetically correlated traits in natural populations D. falleni. SN - 0014-3820 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15119442/Ecological_genetics_of_abdominal_pigmentation_in_Drosophila_falleni:_a_pleiotropic_link_to_nematode_parasitism_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0014-3820&date=2004&volume=58&issue=3&spage=587 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -