Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Health beliefs and communication in the travel clinic consultation as predictors of adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis.
Br J Health Psychol. 2004 May; 9(Pt 2):201-17.BJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The objectives were, first, to determine whether adherence to malaria prophylaxis could be predicted by (i) health beliefs specified by the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour, and (ii) communication during the consultation in a travel clinic; and secondly, to examine the impact of the consultation in changing travellers' health beliefs.

DESIGN

A prospective study using regression analysis.

METHODS

The participants were 130 consecutive travellers attending a travel medicine clinic. Health beliefs were measured pre- and post-consultation. The consultations were coded from audiotape using the Roter Interaction Analysis System and a content analysis method recording discussion about malaria and prophylaxis. Adherence was assessed by a follow-up telephone interview.

RESULTS

Perceived susceptibility to malaria, perceived benefits of medication and intentions to adhere increased significantly as a result of the consultation, and the perceived permanent nature of side effects reduced significantly. At follow-up (N = 107), 62% reported full adherence, 25% partial adherence and 12% poor/no adherence. A multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed that perceived benefits of medication, length of stay, health professional discussion about adherence and travellers' questions and statements independently predicted reported adherence.

CONCLUSIONS

Health beliefs and communication significantly predicted adherence in this setting. The findings also suggested qualitative differences between travellers who adhered fully, partially or poorly. Although the clinic consultation had a positive impact, emphasizing benefits of medication and resolving potential barriers to adherence could improve adherence in the population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sub-Department of Clinical Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15125805

Citation

Farquharson, Lorna, et al. "Health Beliefs and Communication in the Travel Clinic Consultation as Predictors of Adherence to Malaria Chemoprophylaxis." British Journal of Health Psychology, vol. 9, no. Pt 2, 2004, pp. 201-17.
Farquharson L, Noble LM, Barker C, et al. Health beliefs and communication in the travel clinic consultation as predictors of adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis. Br J Health Psychol. 2004;9(Pt 2):201-17.
Farquharson, L., Noble, L. M., Barker, C., & Behrens, R. H. (2004). Health beliefs and communication in the travel clinic consultation as predictors of adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis. British Journal of Health Psychology, 9(Pt 2), 201-17.
Farquharson L, et al. Health Beliefs and Communication in the Travel Clinic Consultation as Predictors of Adherence to Malaria Chemoprophylaxis. Br J Health Psychol. 2004;9(Pt 2):201-17. PubMed PMID: 15125805.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health beliefs and communication in the travel clinic consultation as predictors of adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis. AU - Farquharson,Lorna, AU - Noble,Lorraine M, AU - Barker,Chris, AU - Behrens,Ron H, PY - 2004/5/6/pubmed PY - 2004/8/26/medline PY - 2004/5/6/entrez SP - 201 EP - 17 JF - British journal of health psychology JO - Br J Health Psychol VL - 9 IS - Pt 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The objectives were, first, to determine whether adherence to malaria prophylaxis could be predicted by (i) health beliefs specified by the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour, and (ii) communication during the consultation in a travel clinic; and secondly, to examine the impact of the consultation in changing travellers' health beliefs. DESIGN: A prospective study using regression analysis. METHODS: The participants were 130 consecutive travellers attending a travel medicine clinic. Health beliefs were measured pre- and post-consultation. The consultations were coded from audiotape using the Roter Interaction Analysis System and a content analysis method recording discussion about malaria and prophylaxis. Adherence was assessed by a follow-up telephone interview. RESULTS: Perceived susceptibility to malaria, perceived benefits of medication and intentions to adhere increased significantly as a result of the consultation, and the perceived permanent nature of side effects reduced significantly. At follow-up (N = 107), 62% reported full adherence, 25% partial adherence and 12% poor/no adherence. A multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed that perceived benefits of medication, length of stay, health professional discussion about adherence and travellers' questions and statements independently predicted reported adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Health beliefs and communication significantly predicted adherence in this setting. The findings also suggested qualitative differences between travellers who adhered fully, partially or poorly. Although the clinic consultation had a positive impact, emphasizing benefits of medication and resolving potential barriers to adherence could improve adherence in the population. SN - 1359-107X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15125805/Health_beliefs_and_communication_in_the_travel_clinic_consultation_as_predictors_of_adherence_to_malaria_chemoprophylaxis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1348/135910704773891050 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -