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Sensory cueing effects on maximal speed gait initiation in persons with Parkinson's disease and healthy elders.
Gait Posture. 2004 Jun; 19(3):215-25.GP

Abstract

Researchers have suggested that sensory cues can improve gait initiation in persons with Parkinson's disease (PD); however, there is little research that documents the effects of sensory cues on gait initiation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of auditory and cutaneous sensory cues on maximal speed gait initiation in person's with PD and healthy elderly. Seven persons with PD of moderate severity (mean age=69 years) and seven age, gender, and height matched healthy elders participated. Temporal, kinematic and center of pressure (COP) data were recorded as participants performed eight trials within four randomly ordered conditions (no cue (NC), a single auditory cue (SA), repetitive auditory cues (RA), and repetitive cutaneous cues (RC)). In each condition, participants were instructed to perform each gait initiation trial at their maximal speed. In all conditions, person's with PD reacted more slowly and moved less far than did the matched elders. Relative to conditions with NCs, sensory cueing resulted in decreased double limb support (DLS), and increased COP displacement and velocity in both groups. However, in both groups, displacements and velocities of the swing limb and sacrum during the sensory-cued conditions were less than those during the NC condition. These results suggest that when movement speed is a primary goal, sensory cues may interfere with swing limb and body movement outcomes during the gait initiation task in both person's with PD and healthy elders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Physical Therapy, University of Utah, 520 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA. lee.dibble@hsc.utah.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15125910

Citation

Dibble, Leland E., et al. "Sensory Cueing Effects On Maximal Speed Gait Initiation in Persons With Parkinson's Disease and Healthy Elders." Gait & Posture, vol. 19, no. 3, 2004, pp. 215-25.
Dibble LE, Nicholson DE, Shultz B, et al. Sensory cueing effects on maximal speed gait initiation in persons with Parkinson's disease and healthy elders. Gait Posture. 2004;19(3):215-25.
Dibble, L. E., Nicholson, D. E., Shultz, B., MacWilliams, B. A., Marcus, R. L., & Moncur, C. (2004). Sensory cueing effects on maximal speed gait initiation in persons with Parkinson's disease and healthy elders. Gait & Posture, 19(3), 215-25.
Dibble LE, et al. Sensory Cueing Effects On Maximal Speed Gait Initiation in Persons With Parkinson's Disease and Healthy Elders. Gait Posture. 2004;19(3):215-25. PubMed PMID: 15125910.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sensory cueing effects on maximal speed gait initiation in persons with Parkinson's disease and healthy elders. AU - Dibble,Leland E, AU - Nicholson,Diane E, AU - Shultz,Barry, AU - MacWilliams,Bruce A, AU - Marcus,Robin L, AU - Moncur,Carolee, PY - 2003/04/16/accepted PY - 2004/5/6/pubmed PY - 2004/8/27/medline PY - 2004/5/6/entrez SP - 215 EP - 25 JF - Gait & posture JO - Gait Posture VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - Researchers have suggested that sensory cues can improve gait initiation in persons with Parkinson's disease (PD); however, there is little research that documents the effects of sensory cues on gait initiation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of auditory and cutaneous sensory cues on maximal speed gait initiation in person's with PD and healthy elderly. Seven persons with PD of moderate severity (mean age=69 years) and seven age, gender, and height matched healthy elders participated. Temporal, kinematic and center of pressure (COP) data were recorded as participants performed eight trials within four randomly ordered conditions (no cue (NC), a single auditory cue (SA), repetitive auditory cues (RA), and repetitive cutaneous cues (RC)). In each condition, participants were instructed to perform each gait initiation trial at their maximal speed. In all conditions, person's with PD reacted more slowly and moved less far than did the matched elders. Relative to conditions with NCs, sensory cueing resulted in decreased double limb support (DLS), and increased COP displacement and velocity in both groups. However, in both groups, displacements and velocities of the swing limb and sacrum during the sensory-cued conditions were less than those during the NC condition. These results suggest that when movement speed is a primary goal, sensory cues may interfere with swing limb and body movement outcomes during the gait initiation task in both person's with PD and healthy elders. SN - 0966-6362 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15125910/Sensory_cueing_effects_on_maximal_speed_gait_initiation_in_persons_with_Parkinson's_disease_and_healthy_elders_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0966636203000651 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -