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Midlife dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of late-life incident dementia: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study.

Abstract

Antioxidants have been hypothesized to protect against Alzheimer's disease, but studies conducted in late life have been inconsistent. Risk factors measured in midlife may better predict dementia in late life because they are less affected by the disease process. The authors examined the association of midlife dietary intake of antioxidants to late-life dementia and its subtypes. Data were obtained from the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study, a prospective community-based study of Japanese-American men who were aged 45-68 years in 1965-1968, when a 24-hour dietary recall was administered. The analysis included 2,459 men with complete dietary data who were dementia-free at the first assessment in 1991-1993 and were examined up to two times for dementia between 1991 and 1999. The sample included 235 incident cases of dementia (102 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 38 cases of Alzheimer's disease with contributing cerebrovascular disease, and 44 cases of vascular dementia). Relative risks by quartile of intake were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models with age as the time scale, after adjustment for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, cardiovascular risk factors, other dietary constituents, and apolipoprotein E e4. Intakes of beta-carotene, flavonoids, and vitamins E and C were not associated with the risk of dementia or its subtypes. This analysis suggests that midlife dietary intake of antioxidants does not modify the risk of late-life dementia or its most prevalent subtypes.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Neuroepidemiology Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

    , , ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 159:10 2004 May 15 pg 959-67

    MeSH

    Age Distribution
    Aged
    Aging
    Alzheimer Disease
    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Asian Americans
    Dementia
    Dementia, Vascular
    Diet Surveys
    Feeding Behavior
    Flavonoids
    Hawaii
    Humans
    Incidence
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Risk Assessment
    Smoking
    Vitamin E
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15128608

    Citation

    Laurin, Danielle, et al. "Midlife Dietary Intake of Antioxidants and Risk of Late-life Incident Dementia: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 159, no. 10, 2004, pp. 959-67.
    Laurin D, Masaki KH, Foley DJ, et al. Midlife dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of late-life incident dementia: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2004;159(10):959-67.
    Laurin, D., Masaki, K. H., Foley, D. J., White, L. R., & Launer, L. J. (2004). Midlife dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of late-life incident dementia: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 159(10), pp. 959-67.
    Laurin D, et al. Midlife Dietary Intake of Antioxidants and Risk of Late-life Incident Dementia: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2004 May 15;159(10):959-67. PubMed PMID: 15128608.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Midlife dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of late-life incident dementia: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study. AU - Laurin,Danielle, AU - Masaki,Kamal H, AU - Foley,Daniel J, AU - White,Lon R, AU - Launer,Lenore J, PY - 2004/5/7/pubmed PY - 2004/6/21/medline PY - 2004/5/7/entrez SP - 959 EP - 67 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 159 IS - 10 N2 - Antioxidants have been hypothesized to protect against Alzheimer's disease, but studies conducted in late life have been inconsistent. Risk factors measured in midlife may better predict dementia in late life because they are less affected by the disease process. The authors examined the association of midlife dietary intake of antioxidants to late-life dementia and its subtypes. Data were obtained from the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study, a prospective community-based study of Japanese-American men who were aged 45-68 years in 1965-1968, when a 24-hour dietary recall was administered. The analysis included 2,459 men with complete dietary data who were dementia-free at the first assessment in 1991-1993 and were examined up to two times for dementia between 1991 and 1999. The sample included 235 incident cases of dementia (102 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 38 cases of Alzheimer's disease with contributing cerebrovascular disease, and 44 cases of vascular dementia). Relative risks by quartile of intake were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models with age as the time scale, after adjustment for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, cardiovascular risk factors, other dietary constituents, and apolipoprotein E e4. Intakes of beta-carotene, flavonoids, and vitamins E and C were not associated with the risk of dementia or its subtypes. This analysis suggests that midlife dietary intake of antioxidants does not modify the risk of late-life dementia or its most prevalent subtypes. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15128608/Midlife_dietary_intake_of_antioxidants_and_risk_of_late_life_incident_dementia:_the_Honolulu_Asia_Aging_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwh124 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -