Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Admission blood glucose level as risk indicator of death after myocardial infarction in patients with and without diabetes mellitus.
Arch Intern Med 2004; 164(9):982-8AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

High admission blood glucose levels after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are common and associated with an increased risk of death in subjects with and without known diabetes. Recent data indicate a high prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in patients with unknown diabetes at the time of AMI. We investigated the predictive value of admission blood glucose levels after AMI for long-term prognosis in patients with and without previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus, particularly in those with unknown diabetes but with blood glucose levels in the diabetic range.

METHODS

In a retrospective study with prospective follow-up, 846 patients (737 without and 109 with known diabetes) were eligible for follow-up during a median of 50 months (range, 0-93 months).

RESULTS

During follow-up, 208 nondiabetic patients (28.2%) and 47 diabetic patients (43.1%) died (P =.002). An increase of 18 mg/dL (1 mmol/L) in glucose level was associated with a 4% increase of mortality risk in nondiabetic patients and 5% in diabetic patients (both P<.05). Of the 737 previously nondiabetic subjects, 101 had admission blood glucose levels of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or more, and mortality in these patients was comparable to that in patients who had established diabetes (42.6% vs 43.1%).

CONCLUSIONS

Admission blood glucose level after AMI is an independent predictor of long-term mortality in patients with and without known diabetes. Subjects with unknown diabetes and admission glucose levels of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or more after AMI have mortality rates comparable to those of subjects with established diabetes. Admission blood glucose level may serve to identify subjects at high long-term mortality risk, in particular among those with unknown diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15136307

Citation

Stranders, Ischa, et al. "Admission Blood Glucose Level as Risk Indicator of Death After Myocardial Infarction in Patients With and Without Diabetes Mellitus." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 164, no. 9, 2004, pp. 982-8.
Stranders I, Diamant M, van Gelder RE, et al. Admission blood glucose level as risk indicator of death after myocardial infarction in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(9):982-8.
Stranders, I., Diamant, M., van Gelder, R. E., Spruijt, H. J., Twisk, J. W., Heine, R. J., & Visser, F. C. (2004). Admission blood glucose level as risk indicator of death after myocardial infarction in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Archives of Internal Medicine, 164(9), pp. 982-8.
Stranders I, et al. Admission Blood Glucose Level as Risk Indicator of Death After Myocardial Infarction in Patients With and Without Diabetes Mellitus. Arch Intern Med. 2004 May 10;164(9):982-8. PubMed PMID: 15136307.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Admission blood glucose level as risk indicator of death after myocardial infarction in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. AU - Stranders,Ischa, AU - Diamant,Michaela, AU - van Gelder,Rogier E, AU - Spruijt,Hugo J, AU - Twisk,Jos W R, AU - Heine,Robert J, AU - Visser,Frans C, PY - 2004/5/12/pubmed PY - 2004/6/21/medline PY - 2004/5/12/entrez SP - 982 EP - 8 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 164 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: High admission blood glucose levels after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are common and associated with an increased risk of death in subjects with and without known diabetes. Recent data indicate a high prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in patients with unknown diabetes at the time of AMI. We investigated the predictive value of admission blood glucose levels after AMI for long-term prognosis in patients with and without previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus, particularly in those with unknown diabetes but with blood glucose levels in the diabetic range. METHODS: In a retrospective study with prospective follow-up, 846 patients (737 without and 109 with known diabetes) were eligible for follow-up during a median of 50 months (range, 0-93 months). RESULTS: During follow-up, 208 nondiabetic patients (28.2%) and 47 diabetic patients (43.1%) died (P =.002). An increase of 18 mg/dL (1 mmol/L) in glucose level was associated with a 4% increase of mortality risk in nondiabetic patients and 5% in diabetic patients (both P<.05). Of the 737 previously nondiabetic subjects, 101 had admission blood glucose levels of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or more, and mortality in these patients was comparable to that in patients who had established diabetes (42.6% vs 43.1%). CONCLUSIONS: Admission blood glucose level after AMI is an independent predictor of long-term mortality in patients with and without known diabetes. Subjects with unknown diabetes and admission glucose levels of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or more after AMI have mortality rates comparable to those of subjects with established diabetes. Admission blood glucose level may serve to identify subjects at high long-term mortality risk, in particular among those with unknown diabetes. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15136307/Admission_blood_glucose_level_as_risk_indicator_of_death_after_myocardial_infarction_in_patients_with_and_without_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.164.9.982 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -