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Long-term trends in cancer mortality for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory.
Med J Aust. 2004 May 17; 180(10):504-7.MJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine long-term trends in cancer mortality in the Indigenous people of the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia.

DESIGN

Comparison of cancer mortality rates of the NT Indigenous population with those of the total Australian population for 1991-2000, and examination of time trends in cancer mortality rates in the NT Indigenous population, 1977-2000.

PARTICIPANTS

NT Indigenous and total Australian populations, 1977-2000.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Cancer mortality rate ratios and percentage change in annual mortality rates.

RESULTS

The NT Indigenous cancer mortality rate was higher than the total Australian rate for cancers of the liver, lungs, uterus, cervix and thyroid, and, in younger people only, for cancers of the oropharynx, oesophagus and pancreas. NT Indigenous mortality rates were lower than the total Australian rates for renal cancers and melanoma and, in older people only, for cancers of the prostate and bowel. Differences between Indigenous and total Australian cancer mortality rates were more pronounced among those aged under 64 years for most cancers. NT Indigenous cancer mortality rates increased over the 24-year period for cancers of the oropharynx, pancreas and lung, all of which are smoking-related cancers.

CONCLUSIONS

Cancer is an important and increasing health problem for Indigenous Australians. Cancers that affect Indigenous Australians to a greater extent than other Australians are largely preventable (eg, through smoking cessation, Pap smear programs and hepatitis B vaccination).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Menzies School of Health Research, Institute of Advanced Studies, Charles Darwin University, Casuarina, NT. John.condon@menzies.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15139826

Citation

Condon, John R., et al. "Long-term Trends in Cancer Mortality for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory." The Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 180, no. 10, 2004, pp. 504-7.
Condon JR, Barnes T, Cunningham J, et al. Long-term trends in cancer mortality for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory. Med J Aust. 2004;180(10):504-7.
Condon, J. R., Barnes, T., Cunningham, J., & Armstrong, B. K. (2004). Long-term trends in cancer mortality for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory. The Medical Journal of Australia, 180(10), 504-7.
Condon JR, et al. Long-term Trends in Cancer Mortality for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory. Med J Aust. 2004 May 17;180(10):504-7. PubMed PMID: 15139826.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term trends in cancer mortality for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory. AU - Condon,John R, AU - Barnes,Tony, AU - Cunningham,Joan, AU - Armstrong,Bruce K, PY - 2004/02/13/received PY - 2004/04/15/accepted PY - 2004/5/14/pubmed PY - 2004/7/9/medline PY - 2004/5/14/entrez SP - 504 EP - 7 JF - The Medical journal of Australia JO - Med. J. Aust. VL - 180 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine long-term trends in cancer mortality in the Indigenous people of the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia. DESIGN: Comparison of cancer mortality rates of the NT Indigenous population with those of the total Australian population for 1991-2000, and examination of time trends in cancer mortality rates in the NT Indigenous population, 1977-2000. PARTICIPANTS: NT Indigenous and total Australian populations, 1977-2000. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cancer mortality rate ratios and percentage change in annual mortality rates. RESULTS: The NT Indigenous cancer mortality rate was higher than the total Australian rate for cancers of the liver, lungs, uterus, cervix and thyroid, and, in younger people only, for cancers of the oropharynx, oesophagus and pancreas. NT Indigenous mortality rates were lower than the total Australian rates for renal cancers and melanoma and, in older people only, for cancers of the prostate and bowel. Differences between Indigenous and total Australian cancer mortality rates were more pronounced among those aged under 64 years for most cancers. NT Indigenous cancer mortality rates increased over the 24-year period for cancers of the oropharynx, pancreas and lung, all of which are smoking-related cancers. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer is an important and increasing health problem for Indigenous Australians. Cancers that affect Indigenous Australians to a greater extent than other Australians are largely preventable (eg, through smoking cessation, Pap smear programs and hepatitis B vaccination). SN - 0025-729X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15139826/Long_term_trends_in_cancer_mortality_for_Indigenous_Australians_in_the_Northern_Territory_ L2 - https://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/180_10_170504/con10102_fm.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -