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Transition to child care: associations with infant-mother attachment, infant negative emotion, and cortisol elevations.
Child Dev. 2004 May-Jun; 75(3):639-50.CD

Abstract

Seventy 15-month-old infants were studied at home before starting child care, during adaptation (mothers present) and separation (first 9 days without mothers) phases, and 5 months later. Security of infant-mother attachment was assessed before and 3 months after child care began. In the separation phase, salivary cortisol rose over the first 60 min following the mothers' departures to levels that were 75% to 100% higher than at home. Compared with insecure infants, secure infants had markedly lower cortisol levels during the adaptation phase and higher fuss and cry levels during the separation phase, and their fuss and cry levels were significantly correlated with their cortisol levels. Attachments remained secure or became secure if mothers spent more days adapting their children to child care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Educational and Developmental Psychology, Free University of Berlin, Germany. lieselotte.ahnert@karowberlin.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15144478

Citation

Ahnert, Lieselotte, et al. "Transition to Child Care: Associations With Infant-mother Attachment, Infant Negative Emotion, and Cortisol Elevations." Child Development, vol. 75, no. 3, 2004, pp. 639-50.
Ahnert L, Gunnar MR, Lamb ME, et al. Transition to child care: associations with infant-mother attachment, infant negative emotion, and cortisol elevations. Child Dev. 2004;75(3):639-50.
Ahnert, L., Gunnar, M. R., Lamb, M. E., & Barthel, M. (2004). Transition to child care: associations with infant-mother attachment, infant negative emotion, and cortisol elevations. Child Development, 75(3), 639-50.
Ahnert L, et al. Transition to Child Care: Associations With Infant-mother Attachment, Infant Negative Emotion, and Cortisol Elevations. Child Dev. 2004 May-Jun;75(3):639-50. PubMed PMID: 15144478.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transition to child care: associations with infant-mother attachment, infant negative emotion, and cortisol elevations. AU - Ahnert,Lieselotte, AU - Gunnar,Megan R, AU - Lamb,Michael E, AU - Barthel,Martina, PY - 2004/5/18/pubmed PY - 2004/9/25/medline PY - 2004/5/18/entrez SP - 639 EP - 50 JF - Child development JO - Child Dev VL - 75 IS - 3 N2 - Seventy 15-month-old infants were studied at home before starting child care, during adaptation (mothers present) and separation (first 9 days without mothers) phases, and 5 months later. Security of infant-mother attachment was assessed before and 3 months after child care began. In the separation phase, salivary cortisol rose over the first 60 min following the mothers' departures to levels that were 75% to 100% higher than at home. Compared with insecure infants, secure infants had markedly lower cortisol levels during the adaptation phase and higher fuss and cry levels during the separation phase, and their fuss and cry levels were significantly correlated with their cortisol levels. Attachments remained secure or became secure if mothers spent more days adapting their children to child care. SN - 0009-3920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15144478/Transition_to_child_care:_associations_with_infant_mother_attachment_infant_negative_emotion_and_cortisol_elevations_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0009-3920&date=2004&volume=75&issue=3&spage=639 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -