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Coenzyme Q10 changes are associated with metabolic syndrome.
Clin Chim Acta 2004; 344(1-2):173-9CC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The purpose of this study was to determine whether coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) concentrations and redox status are associated with components of the metabolic syndrome.

METHODS

This is a cross-sectional survey of 223 adults (28-78 years), who were drawn from the ongoing Princeton Follow-up Study in greater Cincinnati. Individuals were assessed for measures of fatness, blood pressure, glucose, lipid profiles, C-reactive protein (CRP), reduced CoQ (ubiquinol), oxidized CoQ (ubiquinone), total CoQ and CoQ redox ratio (ubiquinol/ubiquinone).

RESULTS

After adjusting for age, sex and race, we found that total CoQ, ubiquinol and CRP levels are significantly increased in metabolic syndrome. Comparison of minimal risk and high-risk metabolic syndrome groups indicates an increased CoQ redox ratio in the high risk group (p<0.05). Step-wise logistic regression analysis, using age, sex, race, (ln)CRP, total cholesterol, LDL, ubiquinol, ubiquinone and total CoQ as predictors, shows that only age (p=0.001), total CoQ adjusted for plasma lipids (p<0.0001) and (ln)CRP (p<0.005) were significant predictors of metabolic syndrome.

CONCLUSIONS

The presence of metabolic syndrome components are associated with increased plasma total CoQ and ubiquinol concentrations after adjusting for age, sex and race. An increase in CoQ redox ratio may indicate a gender-specific adaptive response to oxidative stress in females, but not males.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, USA. michael.miles@cchmc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15149886

Citation

Miles, Michael V., et al. "Coenzyme Q10 Changes Are Associated With Metabolic Syndrome." Clinica Chimica Acta; International Journal of Clinical Chemistry, vol. 344, no. 1-2, 2004, pp. 173-9.
Miles MV, Morrison JA, Horn PS, et al. Coenzyme Q10 changes are associated with metabolic syndrome. Clin Chim Acta. 2004;344(1-2):173-9.
Miles, M. V., Morrison, J. A., Horn, P. S., Tang, P. H., & Pesce, A. J. (2004). Coenzyme Q10 changes are associated with metabolic syndrome. Clinica Chimica Acta; International Journal of Clinical Chemistry, 344(1-2), pp. 173-9.
Miles MV, et al. Coenzyme Q10 Changes Are Associated With Metabolic Syndrome. Clin Chim Acta. 2004;344(1-2):173-9. PubMed PMID: 15149886.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coenzyme Q10 changes are associated with metabolic syndrome. AU - Miles,Michael V, AU - Morrison,John A, AU - Horn,Paul S, AU - Tang,Peter H, AU - Pesce,Amadeo J, PY - 2004/01/10/received PY - 2004/02/13/revised PY - 2004/02/23/accepted PY - 2004/5/20/pubmed PY - 2005/2/17/medline PY - 2004/5/20/entrez SP - 173 EP - 9 JF - Clinica chimica acta; international journal of clinical chemistry JO - Clin. Chim. Acta VL - 344 IS - 1-2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) concentrations and redox status are associated with components of the metabolic syndrome. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional survey of 223 adults (28-78 years), who were drawn from the ongoing Princeton Follow-up Study in greater Cincinnati. Individuals were assessed for measures of fatness, blood pressure, glucose, lipid profiles, C-reactive protein (CRP), reduced CoQ (ubiquinol), oxidized CoQ (ubiquinone), total CoQ and CoQ redox ratio (ubiquinol/ubiquinone). RESULTS: After adjusting for age, sex and race, we found that total CoQ, ubiquinol and CRP levels are significantly increased in metabolic syndrome. Comparison of minimal risk and high-risk metabolic syndrome groups indicates an increased CoQ redox ratio in the high risk group (p<0.05). Step-wise logistic regression analysis, using age, sex, race, (ln)CRP, total cholesterol, LDL, ubiquinol, ubiquinone and total CoQ as predictors, shows that only age (p=0.001), total CoQ adjusted for plasma lipids (p<0.0001) and (ln)CRP (p<0.005) were significant predictors of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of metabolic syndrome components are associated with increased plasma total CoQ and ubiquinol concentrations after adjusting for age, sex and race. An increase in CoQ redox ratio may indicate a gender-specific adaptive response to oxidative stress in females, but not males. SN - 0009-8981 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15149886/Coenzyme_Q10_changes_are_associated_with_metabolic_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0009898104001020 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -