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Distinct mutations in PlcR explain why some strains of the Bacillus cereus group are nonhemolytic.
J Bacteriol. 2004 Jun; 186(11):3531-8.JB

Abstract

Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus anthracis are closely related species belonging to the Bacillus cereus group. B. thuringiensis and B. cereus generally produce extracellular proteins, including phospholipases and hemolysins. Transcription of the genes encoding these factors is controlled by the pleiotropic regulator PlcR. Disruption of plcR in B. cereus and B. thuringiensis drastically reduces the hemolytic, lecithinase, and cytotoxic properties of these organisms. B. anthracis does not produce these proteins due to a nonsense mutation in the plcR gene. We screened 400 B. thuringiensis and B. cereus strains for their hemolytic and lecithinase properties. Eight Hly- Lec- strains were selected and analyzed to determine whether this unusual phenotype was due to a mutation similar to that found in B. anthracis. Sequence analysis of the DNA region including the plcR and papR genes of these strains and genetic complementation of the strains with functional copies of plcR and papR indicated that different types of mutations were responsible for these phenotypes. We also found that the plcR genes of three B. anthracis strains belonging to different phylogenetic groups contained the same nonsense mutation, suggesting that this mutation is a distinctive trait of this species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Groupe Génétique et Physiologie des Bacillus pathogènes, Institut Pasteur, 75015 Paris, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15150241

Citation

Slamti, Leyla, et al. "Distinct Mutations in PlcR Explain Why some Strains of the Bacillus Cereus Group Are Nonhemolytic." Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 186, no. 11, 2004, pp. 3531-8.
Slamti L, Perchat S, Gominet M, et al. Distinct mutations in PlcR explain why some strains of the Bacillus cereus group are nonhemolytic. J Bacteriol. 2004;186(11):3531-8.
Slamti, L., Perchat, S., Gominet, M., Vilas-Bôas, G., Fouet, A., Mock, M., Sanchis, V., Chaufaux, J., Gohar, M., & Lereclus, D. (2004). Distinct mutations in PlcR explain why some strains of the Bacillus cereus group are nonhemolytic. Journal of Bacteriology, 186(11), 3531-8.
Slamti L, et al. Distinct Mutations in PlcR Explain Why some Strains of the Bacillus Cereus Group Are Nonhemolytic. J Bacteriol. 2004;186(11):3531-8. PubMed PMID: 15150241.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Distinct mutations in PlcR explain why some strains of the Bacillus cereus group are nonhemolytic. AU - Slamti,Leyla, AU - Perchat,Stéphane, AU - Gominet,Myriam, AU - Vilas-Bôas,Gislayne, AU - Fouet,Agnès, AU - Mock,Michèle, AU - Sanchis,Vincent, AU - Chaufaux,Josette, AU - Gohar,Michel, AU - Lereclus,Didier, PY - 2004/5/20/pubmed PY - 2004/6/21/medline PY - 2004/5/20/entrez SP - 3531 EP - 8 JF - Journal of bacteriology JO - J. Bacteriol. VL - 186 IS - 11 N2 - Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus anthracis are closely related species belonging to the Bacillus cereus group. B. thuringiensis and B. cereus generally produce extracellular proteins, including phospholipases and hemolysins. Transcription of the genes encoding these factors is controlled by the pleiotropic regulator PlcR. Disruption of plcR in B. cereus and B. thuringiensis drastically reduces the hemolytic, lecithinase, and cytotoxic properties of these organisms. B. anthracis does not produce these proteins due to a nonsense mutation in the plcR gene. We screened 400 B. thuringiensis and B. cereus strains for their hemolytic and lecithinase properties. Eight Hly- Lec- strains were selected and analyzed to determine whether this unusual phenotype was due to a mutation similar to that found in B. anthracis. Sequence analysis of the DNA region including the plcR and papR genes of these strains and genetic complementation of the strains with functional copies of plcR and papR indicated that different types of mutations were responsible for these phenotypes. We also found that the plcR genes of three B. anthracis strains belonging to different phylogenetic groups contained the same nonsense mutation, suggesting that this mutation is a distinctive trait of this species. SN - 0021-9193 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15150241/Distinct_mutations_in_PlcR_explain_why_some_strains_of_the_Bacillus_cereus_group_are_nonhemolytic_ L2 - http://jb.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15150241 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -