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Heat strain attenuation while wearing NBC clothing: dry-ice vest compared to water spray.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004 May; 75(5):391-6.AS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

While wearing impermeable nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) clothing, reduction of thermal stress is of primary importance. We compared the effect between two cooling methods on the attenuation of heat strain.

METHODS

There were six male subjects who were divided into two groups of three and exposed on two consecutive days to 125 min of exercise in a high heat load (40 degrees C, 40% RH) wearing NBC clothing. They were cooled by one of two different cooling methods: an active cooling vest (CV) based on the sublimation of dry ice, or tap water spraying (TP).

RESULTS

After 2 h, rectal temperature (Tre) was significantly higher for the CV compared with the TP (38.1 +/- 0.04 degrees C vs. 37.7 +/- 0.10 degrees C, respectively). Skin temperature (Tsk) was significantly higher for the CV compared with the TP (36.60 +/- 0.54 degrees C vs. 34.90 +/- 0.35 degrees C, respectively). In the second hour, heart rate (HR) was significantly higher for CV compared with TP (118 +/- 13 bpm vs. 104 +/- 64 bpm, respectively). Heat storage was significantly higher after the first and second hours for the CV compared with the TP. The physiological strain index (PSI) was higher for CV compared with TP in the second hour. Sweat rate (msw) was significantly higher for CV compared with TP (560 +/- 45 g x h(-1) vs. 409 +/- 84 g x h(-1), respectively). Subjective thermal comfort was not significantly different.

CONCLUSIONS

TP was more effective than the CV in reducing heat strain under the conditions used in the study. Until a significant breakthrough in reducing heat strain while wearing NBC clothing in field conditions can be found, TP appears to be an effective and recommended cooling method.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Heller Institute of Medical Research, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. yheled@sheba.health.gov.ilNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15152890

Citation

Heled, Yuval, et al. "Heat Strain Attenuation While Wearing NBC Clothing: Dry-ice Vest Compared to Water Spray." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 75, no. 5, 2004, pp. 391-6.
Heled Y, Epstein Y, Moran DS. Heat strain attenuation while wearing NBC clothing: dry-ice vest compared to water spray. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004;75(5):391-6.
Heled, Y., Epstein, Y., & Moran, D. S. (2004). Heat strain attenuation while wearing NBC clothing: dry-ice vest compared to water spray. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 75(5), 391-6.
Heled Y, Epstein Y, Moran DS. Heat Strain Attenuation While Wearing NBC Clothing: Dry-ice Vest Compared to Water Spray. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004;75(5):391-6. PubMed PMID: 15152890.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heat strain attenuation while wearing NBC clothing: dry-ice vest compared to water spray. AU - Heled,Yuval, AU - Epstein,Yoram, AU - Moran,Daniel S, PY - 2004/5/22/pubmed PY - 2004/9/4/medline PY - 2004/5/22/entrez SP - 391 EP - 6 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 75 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: While wearing impermeable nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) clothing, reduction of thermal stress is of primary importance. We compared the effect between two cooling methods on the attenuation of heat strain. METHODS: There were six male subjects who were divided into two groups of three and exposed on two consecutive days to 125 min of exercise in a high heat load (40 degrees C, 40% RH) wearing NBC clothing. They were cooled by one of two different cooling methods: an active cooling vest (CV) based on the sublimation of dry ice, or tap water spraying (TP). RESULTS: After 2 h, rectal temperature (Tre) was significantly higher for the CV compared with the TP (38.1 +/- 0.04 degrees C vs. 37.7 +/- 0.10 degrees C, respectively). Skin temperature (Tsk) was significantly higher for the CV compared with the TP (36.60 +/- 0.54 degrees C vs. 34.90 +/- 0.35 degrees C, respectively). In the second hour, heart rate (HR) was significantly higher for CV compared with TP (118 +/- 13 bpm vs. 104 +/- 64 bpm, respectively). Heat storage was significantly higher after the first and second hours for the CV compared with the TP. The physiological strain index (PSI) was higher for CV compared with TP in the second hour. Sweat rate (msw) was significantly higher for CV compared with TP (560 +/- 45 g x h(-1) vs. 409 +/- 84 g x h(-1), respectively). Subjective thermal comfort was not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS: TP was more effective than the CV in reducing heat strain under the conditions used in the study. Until a significant breakthrough in reducing heat strain while wearing NBC clothing in field conditions can be found, TP appears to be an effective and recommended cooling method. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15152890/Heat_strain_attenuation_while_wearing_NBC_clothing:_dry_ice_vest_compared_to_water_spray_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0095-6562&volume=75&issue=5&spage=391&aulast=Heled DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -