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Human factors in maintenance: impact on aircraft mishap frequency and severity.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004 May; 75(5):429-32.AS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Aviation mishaps caused by maintenance factors vary in severity, but can cost untold sums in lives and equipment lost. This study proposes to demonstrate that certain specific maintenance-related human factors are significantly correlated with both mishap frequency and severity.

METHODS

Using information from the Maintenance Error Information Management System (MEIMS), 1,016 aircraft mishaps caused by human factors in maintenance were examined. These mishaps were previously categorized using the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System-Maintenance Extension (HFACS-ME). Frequency analysis was used to determine the most common HFACS-ME factors seen in aircraft mishaps. Logistic regression techniques were used to describe the relationship between the dichotomized outcome of mishap severity and the human factors found in the HFACS-ME.

RESULTS

Inadequate supervision, attention/memory errors, and judgment/decision errors were the factors found most often in aircraft mishaps. The factors of inadequate design, inadequate adaptability/flexibility, inadequate lighting/light, confining workspace, and attention/memory error increased odds of being associated with a higher severity mishap.

DISCUSSION

Emphasis in training and education placed in the first three factors mentioned may reduce overall number of mishaps. Concentrating resources on the final five factors may decrease the number of severe mishaps.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, FL 32508, USA. dckrulak@yahoo.com

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15152895

Citation

Krulak, David C.. "Human Factors in Maintenance: Impact On Aircraft Mishap Frequency and Severity." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 75, no. 5, 2004, pp. 429-32.
Krulak DC. Human factors in maintenance: impact on aircraft mishap frequency and severity. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004;75(5):429-32.
Krulak, D. C. (2004). Human factors in maintenance: impact on aircraft mishap frequency and severity. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 75(5), 429-32.
Krulak DC. Human Factors in Maintenance: Impact On Aircraft Mishap Frequency and Severity. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004;75(5):429-32. PubMed PMID: 15152895.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human factors in maintenance: impact on aircraft mishap frequency and severity. A1 - Krulak,David C, PY - 2004/5/22/pubmed PY - 2004/9/4/medline PY - 2004/5/22/entrez SP - 429 EP - 32 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 75 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Aviation mishaps caused by maintenance factors vary in severity, but can cost untold sums in lives and equipment lost. This study proposes to demonstrate that certain specific maintenance-related human factors are significantly correlated with both mishap frequency and severity. METHODS: Using information from the Maintenance Error Information Management System (MEIMS), 1,016 aircraft mishaps caused by human factors in maintenance were examined. These mishaps were previously categorized using the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System-Maintenance Extension (HFACS-ME). Frequency analysis was used to determine the most common HFACS-ME factors seen in aircraft mishaps. Logistic regression techniques were used to describe the relationship between the dichotomized outcome of mishap severity and the human factors found in the HFACS-ME. RESULTS: Inadequate supervision, attention/memory errors, and judgment/decision errors were the factors found most often in aircraft mishaps. The factors of inadequate design, inadequate adaptability/flexibility, inadequate lighting/light, confining workspace, and attention/memory error increased odds of being associated with a higher severity mishap. DISCUSSION: Emphasis in training and education placed in the first three factors mentioned may reduce overall number of mishaps. Concentrating resources on the final five factors may decrease the number of severe mishaps. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15152895/Human_factors_in_maintenance:_impact_on_aircraft_mishap_frequency_and_severity_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0095-6562&volume=75&issue=5&spage=429&aulast=Krulak DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -