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Dependence of oxalate absorption on the daily calcium intake.

Abstract

Two to 20% of ingested oxalate is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans with a daily 800 mg calcium intake. Calcium is the most potent modifier of the oxalate absorption. Although this has been found repeatedly, the exact correlation between calcium intake and oxalate absorption has not been assessed to date. Investigated was oxalate absorption in healthy volunteers applying 0.37 mmol of the soluble salt sodium [(13)C(2)]oxalate in the calcium intake range from 5 mmol (200 mg) calcium to 45 mmol (1800 mg) calcium. Within the range of 200 to 1200 mg calcium per day, oxalate absorption depended linearly on the calcium intake. With 200 mg calcium per day, the mean absorption (+/- SD) was 17% +/- 8.3%; with 1200 mg calcium per day, the mean absorption was 2.6% +/- 1.5%. Within this range, reduction of the calcium supply by 70 mg increased the oxalate absorption by 1% and vice versa. Calcium addition beyond 1200 mg/d reduced the oxalate absorption only one-tenth as effectively. With 1800 mg calcium per day, the mean absorption was 1.7% +/- 0.9%. The findings may explain why a low-calcium diet increases the risk of calcium oxalate stone formation.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Internal Medicine I, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn, Germany. Gerd.von_Unruh@ukb.uni-bonn.de

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Absorption
    Adult
    Animals
    Calcium Oxalate
    Calcium, Dietary
    Dietary Supplements
    Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
    Female
    Food
    Humans
    Magnesium
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Milk
    Urinary Calculi

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15153567

    Citation

    von Unruh, Gerd E., et al. "Dependence of Oxalate Absorption On the Daily Calcium Intake." Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, vol. 15, no. 6, 2004, pp. 1567-73.
    von Unruh GE, Voss S, Sauerbruch T, et al. Dependence of oxalate absorption on the daily calcium intake. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2004;15(6):1567-73.
    von Unruh, G. E., Voss, S., Sauerbruch, T., & Hesse, A. (2004). Dependence of oxalate absorption on the daily calcium intake. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, 15(6), pp. 1567-73.
    von Unruh GE, et al. Dependence of Oxalate Absorption On the Daily Calcium Intake. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2004;15(6):1567-73. PubMed PMID: 15153567.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dependence of oxalate absorption on the daily calcium intake. AU - von Unruh,Gerd E, AU - Voss,Susanne, AU - Sauerbruch,Tilman, AU - Hesse,Albrecht, PY - 2004/5/22/pubmed PY - 2004/10/7/medline PY - 2004/5/22/entrez SP - 1567 EP - 73 JF - Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN JO - J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. VL - 15 IS - 6 N2 - Two to 20% of ingested oxalate is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans with a daily 800 mg calcium intake. Calcium is the most potent modifier of the oxalate absorption. Although this has been found repeatedly, the exact correlation between calcium intake and oxalate absorption has not been assessed to date. Investigated was oxalate absorption in healthy volunteers applying 0.37 mmol of the soluble salt sodium [(13)C(2)]oxalate in the calcium intake range from 5 mmol (200 mg) calcium to 45 mmol (1800 mg) calcium. Within the range of 200 to 1200 mg calcium per day, oxalate absorption depended linearly on the calcium intake. With 200 mg calcium per day, the mean absorption (+/- SD) was 17% +/- 8.3%; with 1200 mg calcium per day, the mean absorption was 2.6% +/- 1.5%. Within this range, reduction of the calcium supply by 70 mg increased the oxalate absorption by 1% and vice versa. Calcium addition beyond 1200 mg/d reduced the oxalate absorption only one-tenth as effectively. With 1800 mg calcium per day, the mean absorption was 1.7% +/- 0.9%. The findings may explain why a low-calcium diet increases the risk of calcium oxalate stone formation. SN - 1046-6673 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15153567/full_citation L2 - http://jasn.asnjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15153567 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -