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CpG island methylation in Schistosoma- and non-Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer.
Mod Pathol. 2004 Oct; 17(10):1268-74.MP

Abstract

Urothelial carcinomas (TCC) constitute the vast majority of bladder cancers in most of the world. On the other hand, squamous cell bladder carcinoma, a rare subtype in the Western world, is a common subtype in areas with endemic Schistosoma infection. Although schistosomal infection has been reported to influence DNA methylation, the pattern and extent of CpG island hypermethylation in squamous cell carcinomas remain unknown. In this study, we used methylation-specific PCR to characterize 12 cancer-related genes in 41 bladder cancer samples from Egypt (31 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 21 of them associated with Schistosoma and 10 TCC, five of which were Schistosoma-associated). The genes analyzed included E-cadherin, DAP-Kinase, O6MGMT, p14, p15, p16, FHIT, APC, RASSF1A, GSTP1, RARbeta and p73. Methylation of at least one gene was detected in all squamous cell tumors except two, and 45% of samples had at least three methylated genes. The average methylation index was 0.24, corresponding to three of the 12 analyzed genes. Schistosoma-associated tumors had more genes methylated than non-Schistosoma tumors (average MI: 0.29 vs 0.14) (P = 0.027). Although the extent of methylation in TCC (average MI: 0.16) was lower than in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), the overall profile of methylation was similar, with Schistosoma-associated cases having a higher methylation index. Our results suggest that schistosomal involvement associates with a greater degree of epigenetic changes in the bladder epithelium.

Authors+Show Affiliations

King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15154012

Citation

Gutiérrez, Marina I., et al. "CpG Island Methylation in Schistosoma- and non-Schistosoma-associated Bladder Cancer." Modern Pathology : an Official Journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc, vol. 17, no. 10, 2004, pp. 1268-74.
Gutiérrez MI, Siraj AK, Khaled H, et al. CpG island methylation in Schistosoma- and non-Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer. Mod Pathol. 2004;17(10):1268-74.
Gutiérrez, M. I., Siraj, A. K., Khaled, H., Koon, N., El-Rifai, W., & Bhatia, K. (2004). CpG island methylation in Schistosoma- and non-Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer. Modern Pathology : an Official Journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc, 17(10), 1268-74.
Gutiérrez MI, et al. CpG Island Methylation in Schistosoma- and non-Schistosoma-associated Bladder Cancer. Mod Pathol. 2004;17(10):1268-74. PubMed PMID: 15154012.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - CpG island methylation in Schistosoma- and non-Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer. AU - Gutiérrez,Marina I, AU - Siraj,Abdul K, AU - Khaled,Hussein, AU - Koon,Natalie, AU - El-Rifai,Wa'el, AU - Bhatia,Kishor, PY - 2004/5/22/pubmed PY - 2005/1/19/medline PY - 2004/5/22/entrez SP - 1268 EP - 74 JF - Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc JO - Mod Pathol VL - 17 IS - 10 N2 - Urothelial carcinomas (TCC) constitute the vast majority of bladder cancers in most of the world. On the other hand, squamous cell bladder carcinoma, a rare subtype in the Western world, is a common subtype in areas with endemic Schistosoma infection. Although schistosomal infection has been reported to influence DNA methylation, the pattern and extent of CpG island hypermethylation in squamous cell carcinomas remain unknown. In this study, we used methylation-specific PCR to characterize 12 cancer-related genes in 41 bladder cancer samples from Egypt (31 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 21 of them associated with Schistosoma and 10 TCC, five of which were Schistosoma-associated). The genes analyzed included E-cadherin, DAP-Kinase, O6MGMT, p14, p15, p16, FHIT, APC, RASSF1A, GSTP1, RARbeta and p73. Methylation of at least one gene was detected in all squamous cell tumors except two, and 45% of samples had at least three methylated genes. The average methylation index was 0.24, corresponding to three of the 12 analyzed genes. Schistosoma-associated tumors had more genes methylated than non-Schistosoma tumors (average MI: 0.29 vs 0.14) (P = 0.027). Although the extent of methylation in TCC (average MI: 0.16) was lower than in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), the overall profile of methylation was similar, with Schistosoma-associated cases having a higher methylation index. Our results suggest that schistosomal involvement associates with a greater degree of epigenetic changes in the bladder epithelium. SN - 0893-3952 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15154012/CpG_island_methylation_in_Schistosoma__and_non_Schistosoma_associated_bladder_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/modpathol.3800177 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -