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Smoking, alcohol drinking, occupational exposures and social inequalities in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancer.
Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug; 33(4):799-806.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Social inequalities with regard to hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancers are observed in many countries. Differences in alcohol and tobacco consumption are often proposed as an explanation for this finding. The aim of this work was to determine the extent to which alcohol and tobacco consumption, and occupational exposure, explain these inequalities.

METHODS

A hospital-based case-control study included 504 male cases (105 with glottic, 80 with supraglottic, 97 with epilaryngeal, and 201 with hypopharyngeal cancers) and 242 male controls with non-respiratory cancers. Information about sociodemographic characteristics, detailed alcohol and tobacco consumption, educational level, and occupational history were collected. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% CI were computed using logistic regressions.

RESULTS

When controlling for age only, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers were strongly associated with educational level (OR for low versus high level = 3.22, 95% CI: 2.01, 5.18) and with all indicators based on occupation (OR for ever versus never manual worker = 2.54, 95% CI: 1.78, 3.62). When adjusted for alcohol and tobacco consumption, the OR decreased, but remained significant for occupation (OR for ever manual worker = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.23, 2.95). After further adjustment for occupational exposures, significant associations were no longer observed. Associations differed between subsites.

CONCLUSIONS

Social inequalities observed for these cancers are not totally explained by alcohol and tobacco consumption; a substantial proportion could be attributable to occupational exposures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Unité 88-IFR69, 14 rue du Val d'Orne, F-94415 Saint-Maurice Cedex, France. Gwenn.Menvielle@st-maurice-inserm.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15155704

Citation

Menvielle, Gwenn, et al. "Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, Occupational Exposures and Social Inequalities in Hypopharyngeal and Laryngeal Cancer." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 33, no. 4, 2004, pp. 799-806.
Menvielle G, Luce D, Goldberg P, et al. Smoking, alcohol drinking, occupational exposures and social inequalities in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancer. Int J Epidemiol. 2004;33(4):799-806.
Menvielle, G., Luce, D., Goldberg, P., & Leclerc, A. (2004). Smoking, alcohol drinking, occupational exposures and social inequalities in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancer. International Journal of Epidemiology, 33(4), 799-806.
Menvielle G, et al. Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, Occupational Exposures and Social Inequalities in Hypopharyngeal and Laryngeal Cancer. Int J Epidemiol. 2004;33(4):799-806. PubMed PMID: 15155704.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking, alcohol drinking, occupational exposures and social inequalities in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancer. AU - Menvielle,Gwenn, AU - Luce,Danièle, AU - Goldberg,Paquerette, AU - Leclerc,Annette, Y1 - 2004/05/20/ PY - 2004/5/25/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/5/25/entrez SP - 799 EP - 806 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 33 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Social inequalities with regard to hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancers are observed in many countries. Differences in alcohol and tobacco consumption are often proposed as an explanation for this finding. The aim of this work was to determine the extent to which alcohol and tobacco consumption, and occupational exposure, explain these inequalities. METHODS: A hospital-based case-control study included 504 male cases (105 with glottic, 80 with supraglottic, 97 with epilaryngeal, and 201 with hypopharyngeal cancers) and 242 male controls with non-respiratory cancers. Information about sociodemographic characteristics, detailed alcohol and tobacco consumption, educational level, and occupational history were collected. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% CI were computed using logistic regressions. RESULTS: When controlling for age only, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers were strongly associated with educational level (OR for low versus high level = 3.22, 95% CI: 2.01, 5.18) and with all indicators based on occupation (OR for ever versus never manual worker = 2.54, 95% CI: 1.78, 3.62). When adjusted for alcohol and tobacco consumption, the OR decreased, but remained significant for occupation (OR for ever manual worker = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.23, 2.95). After further adjustment for occupational exposures, significant associations were no longer observed. Associations differed between subsites. CONCLUSIONS: Social inequalities observed for these cancers are not totally explained by alcohol and tobacco consumption; a substantial proportion could be attributable to occupational exposures. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15155704/Smoking_alcohol_drinking_occupational_exposures_and_social_inequalities_in_hypopharyngeal_and_laryngeal_cancer_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/dyh090 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -