Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Outcome of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG): comparison of two policies in a 4-year experience.
Clin Nutr. 2004 Jun; 23(3):341-6.CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the technique of choice for long-term enteral nutrition. Though safe and technically simple, PEG has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality.

AIM

We compared the outcome of strategies applied in two different periods; the original approach of PEG insertion during hospitalization (upon request), and PEG insertion 30 days after hospital discharge.

METHODS

A cohort of 127 patients scheduled for PEG insertion from 1.1.1997 to 31.12.2000, was evaluated. In 61 consecutive patients admitted from 1.1.1997 to 31.12.1998 the PEG insertion was planned during hospitalization, as close to the time of the physician's request (period 1). Sixty-six consecutive patients admitted from 1.1.1999 to 31.12.2000 were scheduled for the PEG insertion 30 days after discharge (period 2). The 30-day mortality rate was calculated from the time of the request. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to find predictive factors for 30-day mortality.

RESULTS

There were 61 patients with a mean age of 78+/-13 in period 1, and 66 patients with a mean age of 77.8+/-15.5 in period 2. There was no significant difference between patients of the two periods in regard to age, sex, underlying disease, nutritional and mental status. Patients received PEG 30 days after hospital discharge had a 40% lower 30-day mortality rate than patients who received PEG during hospitalization from the time of request for PEG (P=0.01) and a 87.5% lower rate when calculated from the time of insertion (P<0.0001). In-hospital PEG insertion, bed-ridden and disorientation were found to be independent factors predictive of 30-day mortality after PEG insertion (P=0.016,P=0.001, and P=0.0005, respectively).

CONCLUSION

PEG insertion during hospitalization increases mortality and should be avoided. A grace period of 30 days with nasogastric tube feeding before PEG insertion may prevent mortality and achieve a long-term enteral nutrition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15158297

Citation

Abuksis, Galia, et al. "Outcome of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG): Comparison of Two Policies in a 4-year Experience." Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), vol. 23, no. 3, 2004, pp. 341-6.
Abuksis G, Mor M, Plaut S, et al. Outcome of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG): comparison of two policies in a 4-year experience. Clin Nutr. 2004;23(3):341-6.
Abuksis, G., Mor, M., Plaut, S., Fraser, G., & Niv, Y. (2004). Outcome of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG): comparison of two policies in a 4-year experience. Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 23(3), 341-6.
Abuksis G, et al. Outcome of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG): Comparison of Two Policies in a 4-year Experience. Clin Nutr. 2004;23(3):341-6. PubMed PMID: 15158297.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Outcome of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG): comparison of two policies in a 4-year experience. AU - Abuksis,Galia, AU - Mor,Meli, AU - Plaut,Shlomit, AU - Fraser,Gerald, AU - Niv,Yaron, PY - 2003/05/15/received PY - 2003/08/13/accepted PY - 2004/5/26/pubmed PY - 2004/10/1/medline PY - 2004/5/26/entrez SP - 341 EP - 6 JF - Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) JO - Clin Nutr VL - 23 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the technique of choice for long-term enteral nutrition. Though safe and technically simple, PEG has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality. AIM: We compared the outcome of strategies applied in two different periods; the original approach of PEG insertion during hospitalization (upon request), and PEG insertion 30 days after hospital discharge. METHODS: A cohort of 127 patients scheduled for PEG insertion from 1.1.1997 to 31.12.2000, was evaluated. In 61 consecutive patients admitted from 1.1.1997 to 31.12.1998 the PEG insertion was planned during hospitalization, as close to the time of the physician's request (period 1). Sixty-six consecutive patients admitted from 1.1.1999 to 31.12.2000 were scheduled for the PEG insertion 30 days after discharge (period 2). The 30-day mortality rate was calculated from the time of the request. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to find predictive factors for 30-day mortality. RESULTS: There were 61 patients with a mean age of 78+/-13 in period 1, and 66 patients with a mean age of 77.8+/-15.5 in period 2. There was no significant difference between patients of the two periods in regard to age, sex, underlying disease, nutritional and mental status. Patients received PEG 30 days after hospital discharge had a 40% lower 30-day mortality rate than patients who received PEG during hospitalization from the time of request for PEG (P=0.01) and a 87.5% lower rate when calculated from the time of insertion (P<0.0001). In-hospital PEG insertion, bed-ridden and disorientation were found to be independent factors predictive of 30-day mortality after PEG insertion (P=0.016,P=0.001, and P=0.0005, respectively). CONCLUSION: PEG insertion during hospitalization increases mortality and should be avoided. A grace period of 30 days with nasogastric tube feeding before PEG insertion may prevent mortality and achieve a long-term enteral nutrition. SN - 0261-5614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15158297/Outcome_of_percutaneous_endoscopic_gastrostomy__PEG_:_comparison_of_two_policies_in_a_4_year_experience_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -